Best fitness tracker 2022 to help you get and stay fit

What is the best fitness tracker and fitness band? Well, it's probably made by Fitbit, and you'll find it here

Best fitness tracker: image shows runner looking at fitness tracker
(Image credit: Getty)

The best fitness tracker used to be a heavily contested area. While some people might gravitate towards more expensive fitness wearables, you're best off getting a cheap fitness tracker if you only need a wearable to track – err – general fitness. Even the most basic fitness bands nowadays tend to include optical heart rate sensors, GPS and great companion apps, so they are well worth considering.

Fitness trackers represent an excellent value for money, making them more appealing than even the best running watches or best triathlon watches to people on a budget. For example, the Fitbit Charge 5 costs a quarter as much as an Apple Watch 6, yet it has built-in GPS, an optical heart rate sensor, and tracks steps, sleep and exercise, to mention a few key features.

Most people prefer Fitbits over other brands, and if you want to know what is the best Fitbit at the moment, you'd better read our comprehensive buying guide today. For the best deals on fitness wearables, check out our best Fitbit deals and Garmin watch deals roundups: prices are always up to date (and cheap).

Best fitness trackers to buy right now

Why you can trust T3 Our expert reviewers spend hours testing and comparing products and services so you can choose the best for you. Find out more about how we test.

Whoop 4.0 on white backgroundT3 Awards 2022 Winner's Badge

(Image credit: Whoop)
Best fitness tracker for actually tracking fitness

Specifications

Battery life: up to 5 days
Wrist hear rate: Yes
GPS: No

Reasons to buy

+
Comfortable enough to wear 24/7
+
Tracks heart rate and strain accurately
+
Sleep tracking is excellent
+
Health Monitor overview is useful and easy to understand

Reasons to avoid

-
Doesn’t track basic stats (e.g. steps)
-
Membership costs can stack up
-
Not the most precise when worn on the wrist

The Whoop 4.0 is an excellent fitness tracker but mainly for those who prefer to train hard and would like to know when to slow down a bit. It could also come in handy for people who are generally interested in how well their bodies recover from day-to-day strain.

We will be surprised if people who are only somewhat interested in their performance are willing to shell out the monthly cost to access their stats. Whoop membership costs can add up over time, and even if you're not using the band, you'll still have to pay the monthly fee.

We enjoyed using the Whoop 4.0 band during the testing period – no wonder we awarded the band four stars in our Whoop 4.0 review. If you’re into fitness and sports, the Whoop 4.0 can help you achieve the optimal balance between rest and workouts.

NEWS FLASH! The Whoop 4.0 won the Best Fitness Tracker category at the T3 Awards 2022!

Fitbit Charge 5 reviewT3 Approved badge

(Image credit: Matt Kollat)
Best Fitbit fitness tracker

Specifications

Battery life: up to 7 days
Wrist heart rate: Yes
GPS: Yes, built-in

Reasons to buy

+
AMOLED screen
+
6-month Fitbit Premium subscription included in the price
+
Excellent sleep tracking capabilities
+
Infinity Band is comfortable to wear 24/7

Reasons to avoid

-
HR tracking/GPS issues
-
Expensive

The Fitbit Charge 5 is a decent update over the Charge 4, and the AMOLED screen is very handsome. In our Fitbit Charge 5 review, we mentioned that the updated Infinity Band is comfortable to wear for both exercising and sleeping. The overall user experience is also great; at this point, Fitbit knows how to create a usable fitness wearable.

The Daily Readiness Score is a good addition, and the fact that the Fitbit Charge 5 can measure ECG is just the icing on the cake. GPS and HR tracking could be more seamless, though. Given the location of the GPS antenna, the Fitbit Charge 5 will either provide accurate heart rate readings or spot-on route tracking, but not both.

Not to mention that at RRP, the Charge 5 is as expensive as a more accurate beginner running watches such as the Garmin Forerunner 55 or the Coros Pace 2. Thankfully, you can already come across cheap Fitbit Charge 5 deals online and should you find one; it's a no-brainer to get a Charge 5 today.

Huawei Band 7 reviewT3 Award

(Image credit: Jo Ebsworth)
Best cheap fitness tracker with a huge AMOLED screen

Specifications

Battery life: up to two weeks
Wrist heart rate: Yes
GPS: Yes, connected

Reasons to buy

+
Amazingly slim, lightweight, and comfortable
+
Beautiful AMOLED display
+
Long battery life (plus fast charge)
+
Tracks heart rate and steps accurately
+
Tons of health & fitness features for a bargain price

Reasons to avoid

-
No built-in GPS (it has connected GPS, though)
-
Not worth the upgrade if you already have the Band 6

The Huawei Band 7 isn’t a drastic re-imagination of its predecessor, the equally as capable Band 6, but it's worth your attention, especially if you're after a dainty fitness tracker with a pretty screen and long battery life.

The small refinements applied to this fitness tracker, including the decreased weight and thinner body, are very welcome in terms of increased comfort and wearability, and the always-on display is a great add-on. 

Existing Band 6 owners have no major reason to rush out and upgrade to the Huawei Band 7 anytime soon, especially when the two bands are almost identical in appearance and features. However, don’t let that observation detract you from the fact that the Huawei Band 7 is an amazing fitness tracker sold at an incredibly affordable price – at least half the price of the Fitbit Charge 5. 

So, if you’re in the market for a new fitness tracker that’s accurate, attractive, functional, and jam-packed with useful features, the Huawei Band 7 deserves to be at the top of your wish list, if only for the beautiful AMOLED display and fantastic comfort factor.

Read our full Huawei Band 7 review

Garmin Venu 2 displaying sleep statsT3 Award

(Image credit: Future)
Best premium fitness tracker

Specifications

Battery life: up to 6 days
Wrist hear rate: Yes
GPS: Yes, built-in

Reasons to buy

+
Great battery life
+
Large AMOLED screen
+
New Elevate sensor seems to work well
+
Touch controls work seamlessly

Reasons to avoid

-
Muscle Map feature is not super useful
-
You're supposed to wear it 24/7 for the algorithm to work accurately
-
Comparatively expensive

In our Garmin Venu 2 review, we noted that the AMOLED screen of this fitness tracker brings the widget view of the Garmin OS to life. Animations for hitting your step goals never looked so pretty!

Not all new features of the Venu 2 are mind-blowing or innovative, but they certainly are interesting enough for the average user. Better still, the extra features were added on top of the existing ones found in other Garmin wearables, of which there were plenty already; you really can't complain about getting more bang for your buck.

Speaking of price: the Garmin Venu 2 is not a particularly cheap tracker/smartwatch, although it's way more affordable than some other smartwatches that are less capable than the Venu 2.

If you aren't keen on having a dedicated sports wearable wrapped around your wrist and appreciate a good-looking smartwatch with helpful health and fitness features, you'd be silly not to give the Garmin Venu 2 a try.

Huawei Watch Fit 2 reviewT3 Approved badge

(Image credit: Matt Kollat/T3)
Best fitness tracker/smartwatch hybrid

Specifications

Battery life: up to 10 days
Wrist hear rate: Yes
GPS: Yes, built-in

Reasons to buy

+
1.74-inch HUAWEI FullView Display is easy to read
+
Built-in GPS
+
Long battery life
+
97 workout modes + auto workout recognition

Reasons to avoid

-
A bit of an overkill as a fitness tracker
-
Large display makes it unsuitable for people with small wrists

The Huawei Watch Fit 2 is a significant upgrade from the original Watch Fit and offers a lot more functionality, including various sports modes, Bluetooth calling, built-in GPS etc. It's also more expensive than its predecessor, which is not all that surprising if you consider how much more functional this wearable is.

The Watch Fit 2 is closer to the Apple Watch than the Fitbit Charge 5 both in terms of looks and functionality. It makes sense for Huawei to have Watch Fit 2 in its lineup as it also has a more accessibly priced fitness tracker line (the Band series), so having a wearable between the Band and Watch GT line feels natural.

The price is on point, and if you're after a competent fitness tracker/smartwatch, you'll like the Huawei Watch Fit 2. The larger size might make it less appealing to people with smaller wrists than – let's say – the Fitbit Luxe, but you get a lot of functionality in return.

Read our full Huawei Watch Fit 2 review

Fitbit Versa 3 worn on a wristT3 Award


(Image credit: Michelle Rae Uy)
The best fitness tracker/smartwatch hybrid

Specifications

Battery life: 6+ days
Wrist heart-rate: Yes
GPS: Yes, built-in

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent app
+
Choose from two voice assistants
+
Active Zone Minutes
+
SpO2 sensor

Reasons to avoid

-
There is a tiny bit of screen lag
-
'Inductive' button is not perfect by any means
-
Heart rate and GPS accuracy could be improved still

The Fitbit Versa 3 is a very enjoyable fitness smartwatch. It offers more functionality and better looks than most fitness trackers, but it’s maybe not quite as smart and precise as the Apple Watch Series 5. That comparison might not be fair, though, as the Fitbit Versa 3 offers excellent functionality for much less than the Apple Watch 5.

In our Fitbit Versa 3 review, we praised it for being a well-rounded tracker that comes with built-in GPS, in-app workout intensity maps, and PurePulse 2.0 optical heart rate sensor. The Active Zone Minutes feature monitors your fitness activities, even when you're not actively logging workouts – how convenient! The heart rate sensor and built-in GPS could be more accurate, but they are more than adequate for everyday sports activities.

The Fitbit Versa 3 has a built-in speaker and microphone to take quick phone calls, send calls to voicemail and adjust call volume straight from the wrist. Considering the asking price, the Fitbit Versa 3 is definitely a great buy. Should you find one for a discounted price, we recommend getting one, even if you already have a Versa 2.

Garmin Venu Sq on white backgroundT3 Award

(Image credit: Garmin)
Best cheap Garmin fitness tracker

Specifications

Battery life: up to 6 days
Wrist hear rate: Yes
GPS: Yes, built-in

Reasons to buy

+
Built-in GPS and optical heart rate sensor
+
'Liquid crystal' display with optional always-on mode
+
Good GPS battery life (14 hours)

Reasons to avoid

-
Display in comparatively small

As noted in our Garmin Venu Sq review, this is a decent fitness smartwatch, especially considering the asking price. Some corners have been cut to keep the cost down, but nothing really spoils the experience.

The "liquid crystal" display is a bit on the small side, but at least it's responsive and bright. The sensors are precise and use Garmin's proprietary algorithm that's proven to give accurate readings, especially during high-heart rate exercise sessions.

The interface of the Garmin Venu Sq will be familiar to people who used Garmin watches before, but even if you didn't, you could rest assured you won't get lost in obscure menus.

The Venu Sq has many premium features, such as built-in GPS, blood oxygen/stress monitoring, and sleep tracking, regardless of the lower price. And measures it all with relative accuracy, too.

NURVV Run on white backgroundT3 Approved badge

(Image credit: NURVV)
Smart running insoles with built-in GPS

Specifications

Battery life: up to 5 hours
Wrist heart rate: N/A
GPS: Built-in

Reasons to buy

+
Provides excellent running metrics
+
Footstrike Coach is very useful if you suffer from over- or under pronation
+
Built-in GPS
+
Doubles up as a fitness tracker

Reasons to avoid

-
Expensive
-
Physical hardware is a bit fiddly to operate

The NURVV Run insoles are a different kind of fitness tracker than your average wrist wearable. We would recommend it to runners – it's a running insole, after all – as they can provide some exciting new metrics for them. The NURVV Run sensors make these data sets available for every run and measure/score performance, making them easier to understand.

This data doesn't come cheap, though: you have to pay roughly as much for the insoles as for a Garmin Forerunner 245. But thanks to the constant app updates, the NURVV run is getting there, and soon, runners will need to seriously consider whether they should get the NURVV or a running watch.

Not to mention, you can already connect a heart rate monitor to the NURVV pods and feed heart rate data straight into the NURVV App, the combination of the two effectively replacing a running watch.

Not just that, but even in itself, the NURVV Run system can provide data no running watch will ever will (possibly), such as pronation and footstrike, and recommend ways to improve them, should you want to.

The hardware could be more refined, especially the pods/cradle system, as the current iteration is tricky to uncouple. Thankfully, NURVV is very hands-on with all this, and customer reps are happy to help if you have any hardware or software issues.

Want to know more about the NURVV Run system? Read our full NURVV Run Insoles review now.

Polar Ignite worn on a wristT3 Award

(Image credit: Matt Kollat/T3)
Best fitness tracker for runners

Specifications

Battery life: up to 5 days
Wrist heart rate: Yes
GPS: Built-in

Reasons to buy

+
Integrated GPS
+
Useful sleep and training insights

Reasons to avoid

-
No NFC or music storage
-
Feel a bit too plasticky

The Polar Ignite is a great fitness tracker – we said so in our Polar Ignite review.  Mainly aimed at runners, it can track a million other fitness activities like backcountry skiing and fitness dancing. As well as tracking your workouts, it can also monitor sleep and heart rate throughout the day.

Thanks to the built-in GPS, there is no need to carry the phone with you when you go out for an outdoor run. Recording an exercise is as easy as pressing the button on the side and tapping the icon of the desired activity; it shouldn't take you longer than two seconds to start working out.

Wrist-based HR trackers aren't the most precise, but the Polar Ignite does an excellent job of giving you an estimate based on your fitness levels, age, sex, etc. It can also measure VO2 Max with the 'Fitness Test' feature.

The metrics monitored by the Polar Ignite are more than enough for most serious amateurs, the people this fitness watch was designed for. Not only does it give you stats after the exercise has been finished on the watch face, once synchronised with the Polar Flow app, but you can also analyse your training in even more depth.

You can also track your sleep with the Polar Ignite. The only issue – and this is something all fitness trackers have in common – is that wearing a tracker 'snugly' is not comfortable in the long run. The Polar Ignite is by no means the cheapest tracker on this list, but given the range of features, it's a worthwhile investment.

Fitbit Inspire 2 reviewT3 Award

(Image credit: Jennifer Allen)
Dainty Fitbit fitness tracker with long battery life

Specifications

Battery life: up to 10 days
Heart-rate monitoring: Yes
GPS: Connected

Reasons to buy

+
Long battery life
+
Free 1-year Fitbit Premium membership included
+
Active Zone Minutes
+
Sleep tracking

Reasons to avoid

-
Does lack some more advanced features
-
No GPS

The Fitbit Inspire 2 was announced simultaneously as the Fitbit Sense and the Fitbit Versa 3 and got little attention, although it deserves more. This cheap fitness tracker not only has an optical heart rate sensor but also comes fully equipped with features such as the Fitbit Active Zone Minutes and SmartTrack, features we highlighted in our Fitbit Inspire 2 review.

Plus, included in the price is a 1-year Fitbit Premium membership, which would cost more than the fitness tracker itself. You can look at the Inspire 2 as a free fitness tracker when you subscribe to Fitbit Premium – a free fitness tracker with an OLED screen, that is.

The Fitbit Inspire 2 has excellent battery life, too: it can go for up to 10 days in between charges, and since it uses connected GPS, tracking activities outdoors won't drain the battery more either (you will need to carry the phone with you, though). And of course, the Inspire 2 makes full use of the excellent Fitbit App: in the app, you can set up goals, check sleep stats and more.

Garmin Vivofit Jr 3 on white backgroundT3 Award

(Image credit: Garmin)
Best fitness tracker for kids

Specifications

Battery life: '1+ years'
Heart-rate monitoring: No
GPS: No

Reasons to buy

+
Looks like a ‘real’ watch
+
'Gamifies' exercise
+
Long battery life

Reasons to avoid

-
Dark screen
-
Quite pricey

The Garmin Vivofit Jr 3 sits somewhere in the middle of the kids' fitness tracker market for price and features – and it does everything quite well. Although the screen is nice and colourful, it's also a bit dim and challenging to read when the light conditions are not optimal.

The watch packs in loads of features but lacks a touchscreen; and it’s nicely built and looks quite attractive, but it isn’t as sleek as the Fitbit or as impressive as Vodafone’s Neo, for example. In short, it lacks the wow factor and may be a little middle-of-the-road for gadget-fiends.  

However, if you have a child who loves Marvel or Disney, or you hate charging gadgets, this watch will be a big hit and, like Iron Man, will blow the competition away, we concluded in our Garmin Vivofit Jr 3 review.

Samsung Galaxy Fit2 on white backgroundT3 Award

(Image credit: Samsung)
Beware of the bloatware

Specifications

Battery life: up to 15 days
Wrist heart rate: Yes
GPS: No

Reasons to buy

+
AMOLED display
+
Tracks sleep
+
Stress tracking

Reasons to avoid

-
The amount of bloatware you need to install on the phone in order to use the Fit2 is ridiculous

The Samsung Galaxy Fit2 isn't a lousy fitness tracker; it has a handsome-looking AMOLED screen, recognises five different exercises automatically, tracks sleep, and has long battery life.

What we don't understand is why it is essential to download and install three different apps and drivers to connect the Fit2 to the phone in the first place. Not to mention the annoying software update reminders, which will appear out of nowhere when one unlocks their phone. Like, whoever allowed the Samsung app to bug the users with these updates without permission?

Phone-related issues aside, the biggest problem of the Samsung Galaxy Fit2 is that there are cheaper and more capable fitness bands from established brands such as Huawei, to mention one. These bands offer more functions (e.g. built-in GPS) and better specs for less. The Fit2 is only recommended to people brand-loyal to Samsung and can't imagine wearing a non-Samsung fitness tracker.

Read our full Samsung Galaxy Fit2 review

Check our Samsung discount codes to pick up savings. 

Two people running up the steps in a stadium wearing fitness trackers

(Image credit: Fitbit)

Fitness trackers: what you need to know

So, walking 10,000 steps per day is absolutely better than walking none, but it won't turn you into Sir Mo Farah.

Tracking your sleep may give you some interesting insights, but it won't necessarily help you sleep any better. I've tried to address those shortcomings by picking out the bands that try to do more, rather than just literally being step counters.

Fitness trackers have issues around accurately calculating how many calories you've burned, how much distance you've covered and what your heart rate is, particularly during vigorous exercise.

Perhaps worst of all, most older fitness trackers made no effort to tell you how fit you are or offer any ways to get fitter. Brands are finally addressing this, largely through estimating your VO2 Max during regular workouts. This gives you a base score for how fit you are, which can be rewarding or terrifying, depending on where you sit on the scale.

How we test the best fitness trackers

The best and only proper way to test fitness trackers is to wear them continuously throughout the day. This includes wearing them for sleeping, showing, workouts and everything else you can think of – this is exactly what we do here at T3 when we're sent a fitness band for a review.

Modern fitness trackers can track heart rate, and some of them even have built-in GPS. If that's the case, we test the accuracy of these against other wearables we know to be accurate, often running watches or heart rate monitors.

Read more about how we test at T3

Is Fitbit or Garmin better?

For those who're planning on tracking everyday fitness activities and don't want to spend a boatload of money, we would recommend getting a Fitbit fitness tracker or smartwatch. Most Fitbits are cheaper than Garmin's wearables and track fitness stats with admirable accuracy.

If you're getting ready for a race, whether it's a running or cycling competition, Garmin watches would be able to help you in training and recovery more efficiently than Fitbits. The Garmin ecosystem is geared towards athletes and is able to provide training insights/tips, something you won't be able to access when using a Fitbit fitness tracker.

Matt Kollat
Fitness Editor

Matt is T3's Fitness Editor and covers everything from smart fitness tech to running and workout shoes, home gym equipment, exercise how-tos, nutrition, cycling, and more. His byline appears in several publications, including Techradar (opens in new tab) and Fit&Well (opens in new tab), and he collaborated with other fitness content creators such as Garage Gym Reviews (opens in new tab).

With contributions from