Best TV 2023: the ultimate TVs money can buy, from QLED to OLED

Nothing but the very best TVs available now, from Samsung, LG, Sony and more, from best picture quality to best built-in sound – there's a best TV option for everyone

The best TV's in the UK: blurred out image of widescrren TV with Netflix on, hand holding remote in forefront
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The best TVs that 2023 has to offer each provide truly exceptional viewing experiences. And in this best-of list we've rounded-up all the very best TVs, as reviewed and rated, from QD-OLED and OLED to QLED or Mini LED – you name it!

We've got a whole host of other TV features on T3 – from the best TVs under £500 to the best TVs under £1000 – so if you want cheaper then look there, because this best TVs page is exactly that: the best of the best you can buy, meaning these options are typically (although not always) more expensive.

These days 4K resolution, or Ultra-HD as it's sometimes known, is the going standard, so that's our starting point for these TVs. But, where relevant, this guide will also feature next-gen 8K TVs in the mix. So what TV should you buy if you want the best? Here are our top 10 picks...

Best TVs 2023: The top 3

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Right now, the best overall TV is the Samsung S95B. Even though it's not the flagship in the company's range, this QD-OLED panel delivers stunning punchy colours and it's reasonably priced too. 

The best TV for most people is the LG C2. No only is LG's panel still splendid to watch, it's a lot more affordable than many of its rivals, available in loads of sizes, and is a great match for pretty much anybody. 

The best-sounding TV is the Philips OLED 937. This superb TV marries picture quality with Ambilight and a superb Bowers & Wilkins soundsystem. Yes, there's the bigger OLED 987, but that'll be too massive for many to contemplate. 

Samsung S95B QD-OLED 4K HDR Smart TVT3 Best Buy badge

(Image credit: Samsung)
The best overall 4K TV

Specifications

Panel type: QD-OLED
Screen sizes: 55in / 65in
High dynamic range (HDR): HDR10, HDR10+, HLG
HDMI: 4 total (2x HDMI 2.1)

Reasons to buy

+
Stunningly bright images thanks to QD-OLED
+
Slim, eye-catching design
+
Great gaming features

Reasons to avoid

-
No Dolby Vision or Dolby Atmos
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Sound could be better

Even though Samsung doesn't position its first QD-OLED telly (what's that? here's an explainer) as the very best it offers, we think it's a stunning balance that, as said in our S95B review, "represents remarkable value for money, with awesome picture quality, a comprehensive smart system, and extensive gaming features".

Sounds like the S95B has it all then? The only real criticism is that the sound could be better, but you can always buy one of the best soundbars for Samsung TVs to help solve that. Oh, and Samsung simply refuses to support Dolby Vision for its HDR content, instead backing HDR10+ as its choice, but that's a minor misgiving in the order of things. 

Want to know the full ins and outs about this stunning QD-OLED TV? Read our full Samsung S95B review for the bigger picture

LG C2 on yellow backgroundT3 Award

(Image credit: LG)
The best TV for most people

Specifications

Panel type: OLED
Screen sizes: 48in / 55in / 65in / 77in / 83in
High dynamic range (HDR): HDR10, Dolby Vision, HLG
HDMI: 4 total (2x HDMI 2.1)

Reasons to buy

+
Great picture
+
Works amazingly well with games
+
Plenty of connectivity

Reasons to avoid

-
No HDR10+
-
Middling sound quality

This is the TV that keeps on giving, because not only is it a high-flier in T3's best OLED TVs category, it's an obvious candidate for this best TVs list too. The reason is simple: in our LG OLED C2 review we said that this is "the best OLED TV for most people", delivering great picture quality at a great price point.

Why not the step-up LG G2 in this position? Because that pricier OLED panel, while brighter and therefore more accomplished, is wall-mount only out of the box and, well, most people aren't likely to want that from an ease-of-install perspective. Read more about this alternative further down the page though.

LG is the daddy of all OLED panels (literally, it makes them for other brands) and so knows exactly what it's doing when it comes to delivering top-tier quality. It knows a thing or two about sound, too, except in the C2 it's not the best ever – so try and budget for one of the best soundbars for LG TVs too. The presence of multiple HDMI 2.1 ports means this is also one of the best gaming TVs you can buy as well, thanks to excellent variable refresh rate (VRR) support it's one of the best TVs for PS5 too. 

Want to know if this OLED TV is the perfect partner for you? Read our full LG OLED C2 review to learn all the details

Philips 65OLED937 Ambilight 4K OLED TV reviewT3 Award

(Image credit: Future / Mike Lowe)
The best-sounding TV you can buy

Specifications

Panel type: OLED
Available sizes: 65in / 77in
High dynamic range (HDR): HDR10, Dolby Vision, HDR10+, HLG
HDMI: 4 total (2x HDMI 2.1)

Reasons to buy

+
Ambilight system looks fantastic
+
Superb picture quality
+
Untouchable sound

Reasons to avoid

-
QD-OLED/QLED/Mini LED can be brighter
-
It's rather pricey

Philips has a couple of special tricks up its sleeve with the OLED 937: it's got built-in Ambilight, which projects real-time LED lighting onto surrounding surfaces, 'expanding' the pictures; and a Bowers & Wilkins built-in soundsystem, styled like a soundbar to the front of the TV, that sounds simply phenomenal. 

Yes, it costs a pretty penny for the pleasure, but if you absolutely must have the best fully integrated TV on the market then, well, this is the OLED answer for you. Support for gaming is very reasonable, too, although really this is an out-and-out cinema enthusiast telly for those in the know. 

Want the best picture and the best sound in one? You'll be wanting to read this full Philips OLED 937 review then, won't you?


Best TV 2023: The best of the rest

Samsung QN95BT3 Awards 2022 Winner's Badge

(Image credit: Samsung)
A great 4K QLED TV for gamers

Specifications

Panel type: Neo QLED (Mini LED)
Available sizes: 55in / 65in / 75in / 85in
High dynamic range (HDR): HDR10, HDR10+, HLG
HDMI: 4x HDMI 2.1 (One Connect box)

Reasons to buy

+
Astounding HDR pictures thanks to Mini-LED
+
One Connect box & 4x HDMI 2.1 features
+
Truly stunning design

Reasons to avoid

-
No Dolby Vision or Dolby Atmos here

The Samsung 4K flagship from 2022 is an incredible thing, with its Neo QLED panel delivering almost searing levels of brightness, but packaged into a gorgeous, slim design that'll take pride of place in any room. This is a Quantum Dot Mini LED TV also manages to deliver black levels and colour reproduction to rival OLED though, which is massively appealing. 

No, Samsung doesn't support Dolby Vision for its roster of HDR formats, but that's about the only real negative to be found here. If you're a gamer, in particular, then the separate One Connect box, with its four HDMI 2.1 ports, makes this the best TV for gamers – which is why it was the T3 Awards winner of both Best TV 2022 and Best Gaming TV 2022.

Want an ultra-bright and gaming-focused TV? Check out our full Samsung QN95B review to learn more about this superb set

Sony A90KT3 Approved badge

(Image credit: Sony)
The best premium small TV you can buy

Specifications

Panel type: OLED
Screen size: 42in / 48in
High dynamic range (HDR): HDR10, Dolby Vision, HLG
HDMI : 4x HDMI 2.1

Reasons to buy

+
Accomplished and convincing images
+
Good gaming feature-set (4x HDMI 2.1)

Reasons to avoid

-
Lacks outright brightness
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Startlingly expensive

Not looking for a gigantic TV (and, let's face it, more and more are only available from 65-inches and up) then Sony's got a refreshing tonic for your consideration: the X90K only comes in 42-inch and 48-inch formats. Its target is clear: to deliver the best quality from a smaller TV panel. And oh boy does it deliver. 

It's not 100 per cent on point though, as we said in our A90K review: "you have to get beyond both the asking price and the shortage of out-and-out brightness". But it acquits itself well: "when you do so, you’re left with a tiny OLED TV that’s capable of big image quality." It's also adept for gamers, thanks to four HDMI 2.1 ports, whereas most competitors only offer two with that spec. 

If you're looking for a small-yet-premium 4K TV then read our full Sony A90K review to see if it's the winner for you

LG G2 OLED wall-mount TVT3 Awards 2022 Winner's Badge

(Image credit: LG)
The best wall-mount TV you can buy

Specifications

Panel type: OLED EX
Screen sizes: 55in / 65in / 77in / 83in / 97in
High dynamic range (HDR): HDR10, Dolby Vision IQ, HLG
HDMI: 4x HDMI 2.1

Reasons to buy

+
Sublime HDR picture
+
Dolby Vision and Dolby Atmos
+
VRR, ALLM, and 4K at 120Hz

Reasons to avoid

-
No HDR10+ support
-
No good if you want a TV stand

If you're looking to wall-mount a TV then this is the one destined for the job: LG's OLED G2 doesn't come with a stand-mount, it's strictly designed for the wall only. And once it's up there it'll look stunning thanks to a slender design and picture quality that's brighter than even its LG OLED C2 cousin. 

That's the key takeaway with the G series model: it's LG's best panel each time around, ensuring an optimum OLED image without rival (well, until the LG OLED G3 launches anyway) given the punch of brightness. You'll need to pay extra for that privilege of course, but for many that'll be worth it, so long as you can forego the presence of HDR10+ (which, given it's Dolby Vision capable, will be no bother to many).

Ready for wall-mounting an epic set? Read our full LG G2 review to see why this is the ideal telly for you

Sony A95K in room with window to the leftT3 Approved badge

(Image credit: Sony)
Another superb QD-OLED option

Specifications

Panel type: QD-OLED
Screen sizes: 65in / 75in
HDR: HDR10, HDR10+, HLG
HDMI : 4 (2x HDMI 2.1)

Reasons to buy

+
Beautifully dynamic and vibrant pictures
+
Excellent sound quality too
+
Distinctive and adjustable design

Reasons to avoid

-
Can lose black level in bright light
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Only two HDMIs support 4K/120Hz
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Much pricier than Samsung's QD-OLED

If money were no object then, in many ways, Sony's QD-OLED champion would beat Samsung's S95B option further up the page. The Sony sounds better for starters. Its pictures are more nuanced and believable too. But it doesn't half cost a lot.

Still, it'll be well worth it for some cinema fans. As we said in our review: "there's so much good to be gleaned from the Sony A95K", going on to praise its brighter-than-standard-OLED picture quality and making it "pretty much by default the best all-round 4K TV we’ve ever seen". 

That enough to convince you? If not, read our full Sony A95K review to get the bigger picture on why this QD-OLED TV is so impressive

Philips OLED 907 TV review with AmbilightT3 Approved badge

(Image credit: Philips)
All about the Ambilight

Specifications

Panel type: OLED
Screen sizes: 48in / 55in / 65in
HDR: HDR10, Dolby Vision, HDR10+, HLG
HDMI : 4 (2x HDMI 2.1)

Reasons to buy

+
Poised, accomplished images from any source
+
Ambilight is always a treat

Reasons to avoid

-
Not cheap considering OLED competition
-
Needs tinkering to get its best

Philips' OLED TVs never fail to impress thanks to Ambilight, whereby the picture is 'projected' in real-time beyond the TV's frame. And while its sound isn't as dramatic as its Philips 937 cousin, we think this sounds better than many of its competitors, which is when its asking price begins to seem all the more reasonable for those of us who don't wish to disturb our neighbours. 

As said in our Philips 907 review: "It doesn’t look any kind of bargain on paper, but once you realise there’s no need for further spending on a soundbar the Philips OLED 907 starts to seem better value. Then you see the picture quality of which it’s capable, and add in the unique effect of its three-sided Ambilight, and the price suddenly seems absolutely fair enough. This is a TV superstar."

If you're looking for Ambilight is this the OLED TV for you? Read our full Philips OLED 907 review to get the fuller picture

Panasonic LZ2000 in living room with grey wallsT3 Approved badge

(Image credit: Panasonic)
The best Dolby Atmos TV out of the box

Specifications

Panel type: OLED
Screen sizes: 55in / 65in / 77in
HDR: HDR10, HDR10+, Dolby Vision, HLG
HDMI : 4 (2x HDMI 2.1)

Reasons to buy

+
360-degree audio is impressive
+
Sublime OLED picture quality

Reasons to avoid

-
Sound can go a little awry sometimes
-
Only two HDMI 2.1 ports

While Philips does a great job of delivering convincing sound from its TVs, it's Panasonic that takes the crown for delivering the most convincing Dolby Atmos surround sound straight out of the box. That's thanks to the LZ2000's huge soundsystem that's positioned all around the rear of the panel, ensuring upfiring coverage that no other TV can compete with, not unless there's a proper surround system mated with it anyway. 

Add to this Panasonic's superb handling of images, its full-house when it comes to HDR format compatibility, and OLED quality that simply rivals the best of them, and this is an epic all-round telly. It's often very fairly priced, too, which may give it a further leg up compared to its most obvious Philips rivals. 

Want an all-in-one TV-and-soundsystem without the need for extras? Read our full Panasonic LZ2000 review to see if this is the TV best suited for you

Samsung QN900B on white backgroundT3 Awards 2022 Winner's Badge

(Image credit: Samsung)
The best 8K TV in the world

Specifications

Panel type: QLED (Mini LED)
Screen sizes: 65in / 75in / 85in
HDR: HDR10, HDR10+, HLG
HDMI : 4x HDMI 2.1 (One Connect box)

Reasons to buy

+
Phenomenal HDR performance
+
OLED-grade black levels
+
4x HDMI 1.2 ports

Reasons to avoid

-
May need a soundbar
-
8K content? What 8K content?
-
Yes, it's pricey

How to choose the best TV for you

Shortlisting your next television can be a complicated business, but a few simple rules of thumb will help.

As we move from HD to 4K and ultimately 8K, screen size becomes a key consideration. To see incremental differences in resolution, you’ll probably need to buy a bigger screen than you had previously, or move your seating closer. Long story short: think big, then buy bigger.

Counter intuitive it may well be, but ultra-large 8K screens are perfect for smaller rooms, if you want to really see every drop of detail. Everything you think you know about viewing distances is changing…

Then there’s viewing environment. If you tend to watch in high ambient lighting, or during daytime, an LED or QLED screen will typically serve you better than OLED. If you prefer to watch with low or no lighting, an OLED will deliver greater subjective contrast and shadow detail. 

Smart platforms are no longer a decisive reason to buy. All TVs are smart these days, and the choice of apps ubiquitous – focus on image quality, price and any other features you're keen on.

What is a 4K TV?

4K refers to the resolution of the TV (ie, how many pixels it has), and is exactly the same as Ultra HD when it comes to TVs. It means the set has a resolution of 3840x2160 – for comparison, that's four times the number of pixels as Full HD sets offer. These days, practically every TV above 40 inches is 4K.

The higher resolution means a far more detailed picture. Not everything you watch is available in 4K, though, so 4K TVs tend to be good at upscaling HD video to Ultra HD – the sets are full of advanced processors and algorithms that can fill in the missing pixels in a really convincing way.

You will also see that 8K TVs are available now – this quadruples the resolution again to 7680x4320. The best 8K TVs (opens in new tab) are very premium purchases, though, and are only worth considering if you're planning to get a really large TV, otherwise you can't really make out the extra pixels anyway.

What types of TV display can I choose from?

OLED TV

The lighting on OLED (organic light emitting diode) TVs is achieved by passing an electric current through an emissive, electroluminescent film. This technique produces beautiful colour and high contrast and also enables screens to be extremely thin and flexible. LG Display is the only supplier of 4K OLED screens to mainstream TV manufacturers, meaning they all use the same panels, but picture processors and implementation all vary, so you can still expect differences between brands.

Quantum Dot/QLED

Samsung is the leading exponent of QLED, a variant of LED LCD display technology that uses a highly efficient Quantum Dot filter that increases brightness and colour volume. QLED screens with a full array backlight offer the best performance when it comes to HDR peak brightness and LCD black level control.

LED TV: Direct LED

Sometimes called FALD (Full Array Local Dimming), these displays are backlit by an array of LEDs (light emitting diodes) directly behind the screen. This enables localised dimming – meaning immediately adjacent areas of brightness and darkness can be displayed more effectively – and greatly improves contrast.

LED TV: Edge LED

With these Edge LED TVs, the LEDs of the backlight are mounted along the edges of the panel. This arrangement enables radically slender displays, but can't achieve the same picture quality as directly lit LED sets. However, Edge LED displays do come in far cheaper, which is why the more budget LED TVs out there use this technology.

What is a smart TV?

This just means that the TV has its own software built-in and the ability to connect to the internet, meaning that you can access streaming services such as Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, Disney+ and so on.

Some manufacturers use their own software that they design: Samsung and LG, for example. Other makers use software made by another company, such as Sony TVs using Google TV software, or TVs from many manufacturers using the Roku TV software.

Today, basically any TV is a smart TV, so you don't need to worry too much about trying to find a particularly smart one.

What should I look for when buying a TV?

Here are some of the things we look for when we review a TV screen, so you should, too...

Contrast: Bright whites shouldn't have any signs of green, pink or blue in them, while blacks should look solid and not washed out, grey, green or blue.

Colours: Look at how bright and solid they are; how noiseless their edges are; how 'dotty' richly saturated areas are and how natural skin looks, especially in dim scenes.

Fine detail: How much texture does the screen give? Does a tree look like a green lump, or can you see the individual leaves?

Edges: Check for ghosting, bright halos and jaggedness, especially around curves.

Motion: Check moving objects and quick camera pans for smearing or blurring, trailing, jerkiness and fizzing dotty noise.

Image artefacts: Look for blockiness, colour bands, grain, smearing, dot crawl: anything that looks like it's added by the TV’s picture processing engine.

What about TV sound?

To provide the best audio to complement the pictures, your TV should be hooked up to a separate audio system, be it soundbar or home cinema separates, but this isn't always an option. So, here's what we listen for when testing a TV's speakers:

Bass: Deep, rounded rumbles that don't cause the set to rattle or speakers to distort cramp or overwhelm the rest of the sound; but that expand when needed.

Vocals: Voices should sound open, rich and clear, not boxed in, nasal or thin.

Trebles: Treble effects should sound clean, rounded and smooth in loud scenes and shouldn't dominate the soundstage.

Soundstage width/depth: A good TV should throw the sound away from the TV, to the sides, forward and back, to give an extra dimension to what's on screen, without losing any coherence.

Mike Lowe
Tech Editor

Mike is the Tech Editor and AV Editor at T3.com. He's been writing about consumer technology for 15 and, as a phones expert, has seen hundreds of handsets over the years – swathes of Android devices, a smattering of iPhones, and a batch of Windows Phone products (remember those?). But that's not all, as a tech aficionado his beat for T3 also covers tablets, laptops, gaming, home cinema, TVs, speakers and more – there's barely a stone unturned that he's not had a hand on. Previously the Reviews Editor at Pocket-lint for a 10 years, he's also provided work for publications such as Wired, The Guardian, Metro, and more. In addition to his tech knowledge, Mike is also a flights and travel expert, having travelled the globe extensively. You'll likely find him setting up a new mobile phone, critiquing the next MacBook, all while planning his next getaway... or cycling somewhere.

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