Best touchscreen gloves 2022: stay connected, even in the coldest weather

We round up the best touchscreen gloves, with conductible digits so you can use your phone without freezing your fingertips off

Included in this guide:

Best touchscreen gloves 2022: Person wearing Extremities Furnace Pro touchscreen gloves
(Image credit: Extremities)

The best touchscreen gloves are designed to help you stay connected when its cold. Regular gloves do not work with touchscreen devices, but these mitts have special conductible bits on the fingertips that let you use your phone, operate a hiking GPS or even check footage on your GoPro, through the fabric. Just a few years ago, touchscreen gloves seemed like a bit of a gimmick, but those days are long gone; now, touchscreen gloves are practically essential. 

Below you'll find a selection of the best touchscreen gloves around right now. When making your choice, keep in mind what you'll be doing when wearing your gloves. Around town pretty much any of this list will be just fine, but begin to venture onto the hillsides in inclement weather and you might be looking for something more beefy (need to sacrifice the touchscreen element for ultimate warmth? Try some of the best cold weather gloves instead). 

As with all gloves, don't be tempted to go too hefty if you're doing big cardio such as walking or running – you'll warm up pretty quick, start to sweat, and lose a bunch of that insulation through it wetting out (explore our running gloves guide for some specialised options there). Finally, touchscreen gloves most commonly have just a conductive finger and thumb, which does limit what you can do with them on. If you're planning more elaborate tech-usage, such as one or two-hand typing on a tablet, look for an option with 10 conductible digits. Whatever you decide, here are the best touchscreen gloves available right now.

The best touchscreen gloves to buy now

Rab Ridge touchscreen gloves

(Image credit: Rab)

1. Rab Ridge touchscreen glove

The best touchscreen gloves for general use

Specifications
Fabric: 63% polyester, 23% wool, 10% nylon, 4% elastane
Sizes: S, M, L, XL
Conductible digits: 4
Reasons to buy
+
Cosy fleece liner
+
Water-resistant outer
+
High quality and smart
Reasons to avoid
-
Not the most dexterous fit

The best touchscreen gloves for most people are the Rab Ridge gloves. This brand is perhaps best known for making some of today's best winter coats, with a particular focus on quality and warmth. These gloves stand out for the same reasons. The charcoal grey knitted outer, with tan detailing and quilted palm reinforcement, looks city-smart but feels durable, while the fleece lining adds extra warmth and a water-resistant finish provides protection from the elements. Be aware that these aren't naturally 'clingy', and you'll need to make sure they fit pretty snugly in order to use the touchscreen functionality easily. The touchscreen sections, on the tip of the thumb and index finger, are quite small, so if you have narrow fingers or your finger doesn't reach right to the end of the glove, they can be a bit unweildy. If you're looking for a general-use touchscreen glove that'll last, this is it. 

Extremities Furnace Pro

(Image credit: Extremities )

2. Extremities Furnace Pro touchscreen gloves

The warmest touchscreen gloves

Specifications
Fabric: 30% Wool, 70% Acrylic
Sizes: S, M, L, XL
Conductible digits: 4
Reasons to buy
+
Warm as toast
+
Trad looks

The Furnace Pro gloves might look like the equivalent of a school-teacher's tweed jacket, all leather patches and home-spun goodness, but there's serious tech lurking in these traditional knitted gloves. The first hint that ‘Furnace' might be appropriate is the weight – 110 grams (medium) is quite a heft for a pair of gloves, and there's an excellent reason for that – a Primaloft Gold insulation layer. That outer is indeed wool, just in an acrylic mix to keep damp at bay, while  an X DRY Extremities membrane ensures the inner stays dry. 

In a final minor masterstroke the conductive touchscreen fingertips mirror the pu leather palm-pad, creating a vintage look that'll blend in with any event, from office to hillwalking. Most importantly though, these will keep you downright toasty whatever the weather throws at you – a modern classic.   

Montane Prism Glove

(Image credit: Montane)

Best lightweight touchscreen gloves

Specifications
Fabric: Recycled outer with DWR, PrimaLoft insulation, microfleece lining
Sizes: S, M, L, XL
Conductible digits: 4
Reasons to buy
+
Trap heat extremely well
+
Very light and packable
+
Great value
Reasons to avoid
-
There are more robust options for adventuring in
-
There are more stylish gloves for urban wear

Our pick for the cosiest touchscreen gloves around right now are the Montane Prism gloves. With an excellent warmth to weight ratio, these pack down into a parcel just a little bigger than an apple, ready to sling in your rucksack just in case they're needed. The index fingers and thumbs are conductible, and pre-curved to make them nice and dexterous, too. PrimaLoft GOLD insulation traps heat remarkably well (in our Montane Prism gloves review, our tester likened these to a pair of mini sleeping bags), and the Pertex Quantum shell offers a good amount of wind resistance while still allowing the fabric to breathe. While these aren't quite hardy enough for proper expeditions, for running, hiking and general casual glove-wearing, they'll work a treat. 

The North Face Montana FUTURELIGHT Etip gloves

(Image credit: The North Face Montana)

The best touchscreen gloves for skiing and snowboarding

Specifications
Fabric: polyester, nylon, polyurethane
Sizes: S, M, L, XL, XXL
Conductible digits: 4 (thumbs and forefingers)
Reasons to buy
+
Super warm
+
Allow easy finger movement
+
Well designed and high quality
Reasons to avoid
-
Hard to operate smaller devices
-
On the bulky side

Designed for winter sports use but actually pretty handy for any very cold weather, the The North Face Montana FUTURELIGHT Etip are our pick for the best touchscreen gloves for skiing and snowboarding. These are gauntlet-style gloves with many features you’d expect to see on a pair of dedicated mountain gloves – plus, of course, the touchscreen-friendly ‘etip’ overlays on thumb and forefinger. There's a synthetic leather palm for durability and flexibility, plus medium-weight insulation to keep things supremely cosy. These also include a layer of FUTURELIGHT, TNF’s flagship waterproof-yet-breathable membrane, which also makes an appearance in the brand's best waterproof jackets. Head to our North Face Montana FUTURELIGHT Etip gloves review to find out more.

Marmot Power Stretch Connect Touchscreen Glove

(Image credit: Marmot)

5. Marmot Power Stretch Connect Touchscreen Glove

The best touchscreen liner glove for milder days

Specifications
Fabric: 91% Polyester, 9% Elastane
Sizes: S, M, L, XL, XXL
Conductible digits: index and middle finger plus thumb
Reasons to buy
+
Nice and flexible
+
Moisture-wicking technology
+
Carabiner loops
Reasons to avoid
-
Not super warm on their own
-
Big logo

For active types who need a liner glove or lighter-weight option for milder days, these Marmot touchscreen gloves are well worth a look. These are made from Polartec Power Stretch fabric, which promises ultimate freedom of movement, and Marmot promises moisture-wicking technology to prevent clammy hands, too. On their own, these aren't built for all-out warmth – instead, they're geared towards active use, milder weather, or for wearing underneath a pair of the best ski gloves. The big logo means they might not be everyone's top choice for urban wear, though. 

Montane Iridium touchscreen Gloves

(Image credit: Montane)

6. Montane Iridium Gloves

A brilliant coming together of form and function

Specifications
Fabric: goat leather and fleece
Sizes: XS, S, M, L, XL
Conductible digits: index finger and thumb
Reasons to buy
+
Ultra-touch
+
Very flexible
Reasons to avoid
-
There are warmer options 

These stylish gloves do what they say on the box – plus a whole lot more. The curved design of the fingers and thumbs make it effortlessly simply to type, without risking bunched-up fabric impeding freedom of movement, and a goat leather-reinforced pad provides extra grip in tough conditions. A hi-tech outer layer (something known as PONTETORTO Tecnostretch, to give it its full name) guarantees a snug, but most importantly, comfortable fit, and a ceramic-inspired print gives you a helping hand (excuse the pun) in the style stakes. Reviews score these slightly lower on 'warmth', so if that's your priority you might want to look elsewhere though.

Tracksmith Inverno Gloves

(Image credit: Tracksmith)

7. Tracksmith Inverno Gloves

The best touchscreen gloves for running

Specifications
Fabric: micro-nylon and elastane
Sizes: S/M and L/XL
Conductible digits: index finger, thumb
Reasons to buy
+
Very flexible
+
Quick drying
+
Soft patch for wiping sweat
Reasons to avoid
-
Overkill if you're not getting active

These gloves are multi-tasking miracles – designed to keep hands toasty warm, while also making it easy to use phones or fitness trackers, thanks to 'phone tips' on the forefingers and thumbs. Those clever bods at Tracksmith have added extra-soft patches of material on the parts of the forefingers and thumbs, so you can wipe snot or spit away without irritating the sensitive skin around your nose and mouth (gross, yes, but we all do it, right?!). The blend of micro-nylon and elastane is designed to be quick-drying, too. For more options, head to our dedicated guide to the best running gloves or the best winter cycling gloves.

SealSkinz Water Repellent All Weather Glove

(Image credit: SealSkinz)

8. SealSkinz Water Repellent All Weather Gloves

The best touchscreen gloves for wet conditions

Specifications
Fabric: 95% Polyester, 5% Elastane
Sizes: S, M, L, XL
Conductible digits: index finger and thumb
Reasons to buy
+
Water repellent
+
Quick drying 
Reasons to avoid
-
Not entirely waterproof

Are you headed somewhere wet? Designed to be ultra-water repellent, these lightweight, single layer, mostly fleece gloves from waterproof specialists SealSkinz have an extra feature. On the palms is a silicone print for added grip, which is a nice feature considering all wearers will likely be packing a phone. However, only the index fingers and thumbs are conductive, so this is pair for checking a phone, but not for maximum productivity. Also, note that these are water repellent but not waterproof, which means in a downpour you're still going to get wet hands – for ultimate waterproofing, you'd be best investing in some ski gloves. 

Moshi Digits Touchscreen Gloves

(Image credit: Moshi)

9. Moshi Digits Touchscreen Gloves

The best touchscreen gloves for all-over conductivity

Specifications
Fabric: GripTrak and micro fleece
Sizes: S/M, L
Conductible digits: 10
Reasons to buy
+
All over conductivity
+
Extra grip
+
Look like regular gloves
Reasons to avoid
-
Not the most durable

Do you need to type and tap in the cold? Available in light grey and dark grey, and in two sizes, these touchscreen gloves from Moshi have conductive fibre on all 10 fingertips. That gives you great versatility, but also safety; the Moshi Digits also have an S-shaped pattern on the palm and fingers that offers a decent grip of handheld devices, which Moshi calls GripTrak. Meanwhile, inside is a microfleece lining for softness and warmth, which is what all gloves should be about. These have a slightly lower price point, and a few reviews have flagged up issues with fraying, so if you need something ultra-durable you might be better looking elsewhere in our ranking.

Berghaus touchscreen glove

(Image credit: Berghaus)

10. Berghaus touchscreen glove

A smart-looking, insulated touchscreen glove

Specifications
Fabric: 100% PolarTec
Sizes: S/M, L/XL, XXL
Conductible digits: 4
Reasons to buy
+
Tried and tested insulation
+
Damp-resistant
Reasons to avoid
-
Not the most hardwearing

The Berghaus touchscreen glove does what it says on the tin – conductive tips on the thumb and forefinger, Polartec material, no frills. The cut is generous to accommodate the generalised sizing (running S,M, L and XL into two sizes), and the styling is designed to crossover between town and country use – although some reviewers report the seams popping, so we'd say these probably are probably more for casual use rather than proper outdoorsing. A key element here is the double-thickness cuff to keep the blood flowing, increasing warmth substantially compared to a thinner cuff. Because these are entirely man-made material, they'll shrug off light rain and drizzle, and remain fairly warm even when soaked, as well as drying quickly. Finally, they're very light indeed, coming in at a mere 42g – that's real bang for buck in warmth terms.