Kask Protone Icon review: pro cycle helmet now better than ever

The premium Kask Protone cycle helmet has had a makeover and now it's even more impressive.

T3 Platinum Award
Kask Protone Icon
(Image credit: Kask)
T3 Verdict

Delicious styling and a general overall to the design and componentry has given the Kask Protone cycle helmet a whole new lease of life. If you have the older, outgoing model it’s well worth giving the revised edition a once over. This is supremely comfortable to wear, is light enough not to be a hindrance and, if you get up some decent speed, the improved aerodynamic qualities are easy to witness.

Reasons to buy
  • +

    Improved design

  • +

    Really light to wear

  • +

    Ten colour options

Reasons to avoid
  • -

    Costly to buy

  • -

    Fits 50cm to 62cm heads

The Kask Protone cycle helmet has been given a makeover and it’s now better than ever. Comfort and safety are two essentials to consider if you’re in the market for new headgear and, as our best cycling helmet guide reveals, the choices are many and varied. However, now that Kask has updated its hugely popular Protone model, you may no longer need to look at anything else. 

Even the box it arrives in suggests that you’re going to be in for a treat. Open up said box and your hopes aren’t dashed either. If you’re already au fait with the Kask brand you’ll know what to expect. If you’re not then think premium, and then double it. Of course, if you’re going for high-end headgear then you’ll pay for it too, with the Protone being one of the most expensive items of safety kit you’ll buy. I’m fine with that though, as this is a real quality item.

If you want to know more about T3's product reviews, take a read of our how we test page. In the meantime though, read on for my thoughts about the Kask Protone cycle helmet.

Kask Protone Icon

(Image credit: Kask)

Kask Protone cycle helmet: price and availability

The Kask Protone cycle helmet is available now and it's a premium model, which means that you’ll expect to pay around £245 for it in the UK, $299.95 in the US and AU$409 down under. That makes it an expensive purchase, but what price personal safety, eh? You can get a whole raft of Kask cycle helmets from Amazon as well as other cycle specialists.

Kask Protone Icon

(Image credit: Kask)

Kask Protone cycle helmet: design, build and safety

If you’re followed cycling for any amount of time you’ll know just how revered the Kask brand is, with the earlier incarnation of the Protone appearing on the head of numerous Tour de France riders, Giro d’Italia entrants and the odd Vuelta a Espana races too. Kask’s Protone has also been in the winning teams of competitors at the 2016 Rio Olympics too, and also Tokyo more recently in 2020.

What that means for us, the everyday cyclist’s who want quality safety gear is that it has been improved over time. Kask has tweaked and fine-tuned the Protone, taking in observations and everyday issues that have appeared during prolonged use by competition cycle teams. The Octofit+ retention system, for example, is now better than ever. It utilises a revised cradle, boasts improved rubber inserts and has a refreshed stabiliser that is sits much better over the neck.

Although there’s much that will appear the same if you compare it to the outgoing Kask Protone model this is very much a new helmet. Indeed, pop it on your head and you’ll immediately feel the difference, compared to the older iteration. The upgraded internal frame structure feels much better in terms of ventilation. Competition cyclists, who are the most likely to buy this I guess, will also notice the improved aerodynamics offered by the sleeker form factor.

It's hard to find out much concrete information on the safety credentials of the Kask Protone cycle helmet. However, I’m pretty sure that the pedigree of this brand and the fact that many cycling pros use its products should ensure that this latest lid meets all of the latest health and safety regulations. Despite the fact that there is an absence of MIPS (or Multi-directional Impact Protection) as part of the design, Kask ensures that its own testing called WG11 is more aligned with real world use. That’s good enough for me.

Kask Protone Icon

(Image credit: Kask)

Kask Protone cycle helmet: in use

I’ve spent just a few days using the Kask Protone cycle helmet so far and I can see why it’s such a popular choice for so many cyclists, especially professionals who don’t have to worry about the cost factor quite so much. The medium model I’ve been wearing is suited to 52-58cm heads and is finished in a fresh white colour. However, you can choose one to suit your own taste as Kask offers in a range of ten different colour variants.

Alongside the brilliant fit and finish of the Kask Protone cycle helmet it also feels wonderful on my head. It weighs in at just 230grams, so you barely notice when you’re wearing it. If you’re on your bike frequently and for long periods of time this makes a huge difference. Similarly, the design allows for plenty of air circulation, which is also a boon if you’re out in hot weather working up a sweat on those never-ending hill climbs.

Kask Protone Icon

(Image credit: Kask)

Kask Protone cycle helmet: verdict

This really is one of the best high-end cycling helmets you can buy, which is both safe and stylish to wear. Kask offers the Protone in now less than ten different colours, with both gloss and matt finishes to choose from. It’s suited to heads from 50cm through to 62cm and is both lightweight but strong. 

In fact, given the premium price point, this is a cycle helmet that should deliver a few years of top service. And, when you’re done with it, the Kask Protone will still look good hanging on your wall at home. It’s a very cool thing to look at.

Kask Protone Icon

(Image credit: Kask)

Rob Clymo has been a tech journalist for more years than he can actually remember, having started out in the wacky world of print magazines before discovering the power of the internet. Since he's been all-digital he has run the Innovation channel during a few years at Microsoft as well as turning out regular news, reviews, features and other content for the likes of TechRadar, TechRadar Pro, Tom's Guide, Fit&Well, Gizmodo, Shortlist, Automotive Interiors World, Automotive Testing Technology International, Future of Transportation and Electric & Hybrid Vehicle Technology International. In the rare moments he's not working he's usually out and about on one of numerous e-bikes in his collection.