Best secateurs 2022: prune, snip, cut and dead-head like a pro

These are the best secateurs you can buy for all your horticultural needs

The best secateurs 2022: Image depicts pair of secateurs on top of garden cuttings
(Image credit: Canva)

The best secateurs (also known as hand pruners), are an essential part of any keen gardener’s tool kit. They’re perfect for cutting small branches, trimming back flowers and pruning any shrubs – basically like a handy pair of scissors for garden use.

Pruning is one of those jobs that can be quite tedious, but must be done regularly to keep your plants healthy and promote new growth. You can’t do this with any old pair of scissors, as plants can sometimes be pretty tough to cut through – hence the best secateurs will make the job quick and easy.

As summer is drawing to a close, now is the time to cut back any of those dead heads and get ready for autumn. In this list is our pick of the best secateurs in 2022 to keep your garden looking tidy all year round.

In addition, you may wish to check out our guide to the best manual garden tools to ensure you have everything you need to keep your garden looking good all year round.

The best secateurs you can buy in 2022

Burgon & Ball Pocket Pruner on white backgroundT3 Best Buy badge

(Image credit: Burgon & Ball)

1. Burgon & Ball Pocket Pruner

Best secateurs for practicality

Reasons to buy

+
Brilliant performer
+
Really small
+
Extra light

Reasons to avoid

-
Old fashioned design

Even if you have large hands, these dinky pocket-sized secateurs are brilliant for snipping stalks, stems or branches up to 1.5cm in diameter. The RHS-endorsed Burgon & Ball Pocket Pruners measure just 17cm in length yet, despite their diminutive size, the curved, grippy handles are easy to hold without any slipping. At 150g, they’re as light as a feather, too.

With their hardened and tempered carbon steel blades, these traditional secateurs make light work of any pruning task. They’re exceedingly comfy in the hand and equipped with a nice, soft spring action that doesn’t require too much effort. Top buy.

GARDENA GARDEN SECATEURS B/S-M on white backgroundT3 Approved badge

(Image credit: Gardena)

2. Gardena Garden Secateurs B/S-M

Best bypass secateurs for general use

Reasons to buy

+
Dual jaw width
+
Effortless practicality
+
Comfy in the hand

Reasons to avoid

-
Not the best for ultra then stems

These brightly-coloured Germanic bypass secateurs are perfect for long stretches in the undergrowth. They also have two different jaw widths for different sized hands and come equipped with stainless steel blades coated in a high-grade plastic grip that feels silky smooth and extraordinarily comfy in the hand. 

As to be expected from a company renowned for its quality garden gear, these bypass secateurs snip green branches up to 22mm in diameter with consummate ease though they’re not especially well suited to snipping really thin 2mm stems. On the plus side, they’re quite cheap to buy and therefore not too precious to accidentally leave outside where you last used them.

Why not compare these topiary snippers to another strong model with T3's Gardena Garden Secateurs B/S-M vs Fiskars Pruner Bypass P57 comparison feature.

Niwaki Mainichi Secateurs on white backgroundT3 Approved badge

(Image credit: Niwaki)

3. Niwaki Mainichi Secateurs

High quality Japanese-made carbon steel secateurs

Reasons to buy

+
Premium SK85 carbon steel blades
+
Stupendous stem snipping

Reasons to avoid

-
Wide spring action
-
Will rust if not looked after

When it comes to blade manufacture – be it kitchen knives or, in this case, garden secateurs – the Japanese are past masters in the art. And as we all know, they’re also connoisseurs of creative gardening. Put the two together and this is the result – a pair of SK85 carbon steel bypass secateurs that are probably sharp enough to shave with.

Now, it must be said that these beautiful secateurs are of the traditional variety which means a simple spring between two slim, plastic-sleeved steel handles. Consequently, they do require a bit more muscular action to prevent the jaws from springing wide open. Also, these are not the type of secateurs to leave lying about in the flowerbed because that beautiful metal work will get badly soiled. In fact, Niwaki advise using a bit of camellia oil every now and then to keep rust at bay.

However, when it comes to snipping delicate stems and thin branches up to 10mm in diameter, these secateurs cut with utmost precision leaving no bruising and an exactness of cut that your plants will thank you for. They’re also reassuringly weighty, comfortable in the hand and feature a blade locking mechanism that has a satisfyingly decisive snap to it.

If you’re a discerning horticulturist who insists on using only the sharpest and best quality garden tools in the shed, then make these secateurs one of your very first ports of call. Alternatively, if money is no object and you want to snip like a professional, opt for the drop-forged and hand finished Niwaki GR Pro (opens in new tab) instead.

Fiskars Plus PowerLever Metal Bypass Pruner P751 on white backgroundT3 Approved badge

(Image credit: Fiskars)

4. Fiskars Plus PowerLever Metal Bypass Pruner P751

Unique bypass secateurs for effortless snipping

Reasons to buy

+
Clever mechanism that maximises leverage
+
Cuts branches up to 24mm in diameter
+
Lovely springy action
+
Robust aluminium build

Reasons to avoid

-
Not suitable for small hands

These smart-looking cast-aluminium bypass pruners from Fiskars incorporate a unique lever mechanism that reduces cutting effort dramatically while maximising leverage. 

Instead of a standard scissor action, the rear of the top blade is split into two and its pivot point extended further back to join the bottom lever midway near the centre of the palm of the hand, creating a pulley-like effect for effortless cutting and excellent leverage when snipping larger stems up to an impressive 24mm in diameter. These secateurs feel quite large in the hand so the only thing missing in our opinion is a two-stage switch to prevent the blades from opening quite so wide when performing lighter topiary tasks.

The Plus PowerLever P751 is a great choice for arthritis sufferers and anyone who simply wants an easier time when pruning. If you have smaller hands, perhaps consider the similarly-styled Fiskars P57 pruner instead.

Corona Deadheading Snip on white backgroundT3 Approved badge

(Image credit: Corona)

5. Corona ComfortGel Deadheading Snip FS3214BB

Slim snippers for sensitive snipping

Reasons to buy

+
Slim, sharp scissor blades
+
Grippy handles with gel coating
+
Also handy for household use

Corona – a leading horticultural brand in the USA – has a history dating back to 1928 when it helped revolutionise the US citrus fruit industry with production of one of the very first professional pruning shears for snipping fruit off the stem without damaging it.

The Corona Deadheading Snips are perfect for deadheading flowers and performing delicate stem work in confined areas. These bypass secateurs feel ultra light in the hand and are equipped with sharp stainless steel blades with bevelled tapered tips for precise cuts. They also boast a light return spring that makes them effortless to use and a ComfortGEL coating that provides superior comfort and plenty of grip.

Fiskars Quantum Bypass Pruner on white backgroundT3 Approved badge

(Image credit: Fiskars)

6. Fiskars Quantum Bypass Pruner

High-end pruners with grippy cork handles and wider cutting diameter

Reasons to buy

+
Classy secateurs for effortless snipping
+
Can cut stalks up to 26mm in diameter
+
Comfy cork handles
+
Smooth action

Reasons to avoid

-
Heavier than the norm

This premium bypass model screams quality all the way from the high-grade aluminium body and ultra-sharp TruEdge bypass blades to the ergonomically designed cork-covered handle. Granted, the Quantum’s weighty feel and larger size makes them more suitable for gardeners with bigger hands, but you’ll love the feel of those cork handles which provide maximum grip, especially when your hands are sweaty. 

This Quantum Bypass’s blades are good for green stems and stalks up to 2.6cm (one inch) in diameter and they perform exceptionally well. The spring, too, is set to just the right amount of tension for minimum effort.

If you’re a bit choosy about your garden tools and are after a pair of classy bypass secateurs that perform exceedingly well while being robustly built, then give this model a whirl.

Spear & Jackson Razorsharp Advantage Adjustable Bypass Secateurs on white backgroundT3 Approved badge

(Image credit: Spear & Jackson)

7. Spear & Jackson Razorsharp Advantage Adjustable Bypass Secateurs 6060BS

Keenly-priced pruners for smaller hands

Reasons to buy

+
Small size for small hands
+
Two jaw widths

Reasons to avoid

-
Not best for big hands

If you find your hands are too small for most secateurs, here’s a great pair of ‘lady size’ bypass pruners that do the job admirably well for around £15. Exceedingly light and small in the hand, these Spear & Jacksons are well up to the task when it comes to snipping back that most annoying of garden plants, the vexatious thorny ninja (aka bramble).

Aside from the slim, easy-grip handles, this model is also equipped with two-stages of jaw width – 75mm for small delicate stems and 114mm for slim green branches. The combination of its SK5 steel blades and bypass cutting action, meanwhile, ensures green stems are cut with minimal bruising. A great buy for those who just can’t get along with normal sized secateurs.

Stihl PG20 Universal Bypass Secateurs on white backgroundT3 Approved badge

(Image credit: Stihl)

8. Stihl PG20 Universal Bypass Secateurs

Good quality German-made secateurs

Reasons to buy

+
Exceedingly comfy
+
Great colour

Reasons to avoid

-
Handle coating is a bit slippery

These bright orange bypass secateurs from power tool manufacturer Stihl are just the ticket for effortless pruning. The slim grips fit perfectly in a large hand and the finger-shaped indents provide extra purchase when cutting thicker branches. However, the jury's out on the smooth plastic covering which is a bit too slippery when wearing leather-style gloves.

The Stihl PG20 (opens in new tab) is equipped with two razor-sharp steel blades for snipping through stems and branches up to around 15mm in diameter. In the pantheon of standard manual pruners, the Stihls feel great in the hand, are extremely sharp and super efficient.

Fiskars Powergear X Pruner PX93 on white backgroundT3 Approved badge

(Image credit: Fiskars)

9. Fiskars Powergear X Pruner PX93

Comfy, effortless anvil secateurs with swivelling hand grip

Reasons to buy

+
Ergonomic lever
+
Clean cutting

Reasons to avoid

-
Anvil action is not ideal for delicate green stems

Where most other pruners come with two fixed grip levers, this model has a finger lever that swivels 45˚ as you close your hand. Fiskars states that its PowerGear mechanism ‘makes cutting up to 3.5 times easier than standard mechanisms’ and we’re inclined to agree.

These particular secateurs are fitted with an anvil mechanism so they’re good for hard, dry branches up to 26mm in width. They’re extremely comfy in the hand and the gently sprung levers don’t open too wide, making them pretty effortless to use. A stalwart addition for your trimming needs.

Spear & Jackson Razorsharp Ratchet Twist Anvil Secateurs on white backgroundT3 Approved badge

(Image credit: Spear & Jackson)

10. Spear & Jackson Razorsharp Ratchet Twist Anvil Secateurs

A great choice for thicker branches

Reasons to buy

+
Cuts branches up to 27mm in diameter
+
Rotating finger grip

Reasons to avoid

-
The four-stage cutting action takes a bit of getting used to

Ratchet action secateurs are brilliant for cutting through tough branches up to 27mm in diameter. Unlike normal secateurs, a ratchet model like this anvil pair from Spear & Jackson uses angled teeth that enable the snipping of bigger branches in four short steps. Simply place the carbon steel blades around the branch and perform the same hand pumping action you would employ with a normal pair of secateurs. The blade will cut only a few millimetres before resetting itself for the second, third and fourth compressions respectively. And all without putting too much of a strain on the finger muscles.

Although the maximum stated width is 20mm, this model managed an even thicker branch of around 27mm though not without some struggle. Mind, the rotating finger grip (a mechanism very similar to the Fiskars secateurs reviewed above) was a massive help because the action does require having your hand outstretched.

If you don’t fancy carrying a large pair of loppers around with you, then pop a pair of these in your tool holster.

When you’ve finally found the best secateurs for your needs, compliment them with some other great gardening items like the best garden sprinkler, the best garden watering system and the best cordless lawn mower.

Which type of secateurs are best for you?

Before you decide on a favourite model, we should address at least one particular piece of garden jargon that you will comes across when choosing the best secateurs for you: bypass and anvil.

Bypass secateurs have blades that are designed to pass each other smoothly as they cut, like scissors. They are perfect for green wood and delicate stems since they give precise, clean cuts and avoid damaging or bruising the branch.

Anvil secateurs, on the other hand, have one sharpened blade that cuts down on a flat hard plastic or rubber block, rather like a small chopping board. Anvil-equipped pruners are great for dead wood and dry, hard, old growth that needs cutting back. Mind, most amateur gardeners will happily make do with either mechanism since they both essentially perform much the same task. But if you were to pick just one type, we would recommend bypass secateurs because they perform both tasks extremely well.

Derek (aka Delbert, Delvis, Delphinium, Delboy etc) specialises in home and outdoor wares, from coffee machines, white appliances and vacs to drones, garden gear and BBQs. He has been writing for more years than anyone can remember, starting at the legendary Time Out magazine – the original, London version – on a typewriter! He now writes for T3 between playing drums with his bandmates in Red Box (redboxmusic).