Best portable power stations 2024: stay charged anywhere

From campsites to road trips, keep your devices powered wherever you roam with the best portable power station

Best portable power stations 2024: Quick links

DJI launches two new power stations, the Power 100 and Power 500

(Image credit: DJI)

01. Best overall: Anker Solix C1000
02. Best for home emergencies: BaseCharge 1500
03. Best portable: EcoFlow River Max
04. Best expandable: Bluetti AC500 + B300S
05. Best premium: Goal Zero Yeti
06. Best power management: Dabbsson DBS2300
07. Best budget: Bluetti PowerOak AC50S
08. How to choose
09. How we test
10. FAQ

What makes the best portable power station? Not to be confused with the power banks, which can recharge smaller devices (but usually not much else) quickly, mobile power stations offer a whole lot more. We're talking about many times the capacity of pocket devices that can power all your gadgets during camping, power cuts and more.

Although a great reason to invest in one of the best portable power stations, and not in the best power banks, is so you can cope with a sudden outage at home, they're ideal for taking away with you on trips to rural areas. That said, don't consider them only for some expeditions.

Yes, you can buy a big, heavy portable power station you can find and head off-grid for a long time, recharging while you drive and from a connected solar panel (we have a separate guide to the best solar chargers if that's your plan).

However, you can just as easily find a portable power station that's big enough to fuel gadgets for a week or two yet small enough to shove in the boot of your car or campervan for a road trip or camping holiday. This guide rounds up the best portable power stations around.

Best portable power stations you can buy right now

Why you can trust T3 Our expert reviewers spend hours testing and comparing products and services so you can choose the best for you. Find out more about how we test.

Best overall

Anker Solix C1000 in the garden

(Image credit: Future)
Best portable power station overall

Specifications

Capacity: 1,056Wh
Weight: 12.9kg / 28.44Ib
Measurements: 14.4 x 12.2 x 8.2 inches
Solar: up to 600W
Outputs: 9
Inputs: 2

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent power specs
+
Easy to use
+
Sturdy construction
+
Integrated LED lamp

Reasons to avoid

-
Heavy to carry long distances

The new 1,056 watt-hour Anker Solix C1000 portable power station is a muscular thoroughbred that trounces most of the opposition by dint of its battery capacity, maximum wattage and sheer number of outputs. If you’re into off-grid car camping, caravanning, motor homing or live in a rural area where power cuts are a fact of life, this potent power supplier is currently one of the very best models money can buy. 

If you’re scouring the market for a relatively lightweight and small portable power station that packs a mighty punch in practically all disciplines, the Anker Solix C1000 is an absolute shoo-in. It’s easy to use, not too heavy given the weight of batteries in general, and it performs more reliably than some electricity companies I know. Top choice.

Read our full Anker Solix C1000 review.

Best for home emergencies

BioLite BaseCharge Home Emergency Kit review

(Image credit: Matt Kollat/T3)
Best portable power station for home emergencies

Specifications

Capacity: 1,521Wh
Weight: 12kg / 26.5 lbs
Measurements: 14.4 x 12.2 x 8.2 inches
Solar: up to 400W
Outputs: 3x AC Ports, 2x 1x DC Barrel Port, 2x USB-A, 2x USB-C, 1x USB-C PD, and 1x Qi Wireless Charging Port
Inputs: Wall/Solar Input (HPP) 400W (12-30V DC, 20A max), USB-C PD 100W

Reasons to buy

+
LCD Smart Dashboard is easy to read and understand
+
Comparatively easy to carry
+
Qi Wireless Charging Port

Reasons to avoid

-
Fans can be loud when you charge multiple devices simultaneously
-
It isn't rugged or weatherproof

The BaseCharge 1500 unit is user-friendly, and despite not being weatherproof or particularly rugged, it can be used at home and on camping trips as long as you can store it somewhere without getting wet. It's light enough to be hauled around easily, and we love the clearly-displayed information on the LCD Smart Dashboard. 

At 26.5 lbs (12kg), it's not terribly heavy, and it comes with two decent-sized handle holes, making it pretty easy to carry the unit around (it measures 14.4 x 12.2 x 8.2 inches). There are plenty of ports allowing you to charge multiple devices simultaneously; however, this might trigger the cooling fans, which are pretty loud. They make a whirring noise similar to small drone propellers. It's not massively annoying, but it's certainly audible.

During testing, we ran our 800W vacuum of it while charging our smartphone via the wireless port, and the BaseCharge 1500 didn't even blink an eye. We charged three drones, one drone controller and a laptop on another occasion, which also seemed acceptable. An exemplary portable power station overall!

Read our full Biolite Basecharge 1500 review.

Best portable

EcoFlow RiverMax portable power station review

(Image credit: T3)
Best portable power station

Specifications

Capacity: 576Wh
Weight: 7.7kg / 17lbs
Measurements: 289x184x235mm / 11.4x7.3x9.3”
Solar: 200W
Outputs: 1x USB-A fast-charge (18W), 2x USB-A (5V/2.4A), 1 x USB-C (100W), 1x 13.6V cigarette lighter, 2x AC (600W), 2x DC
Inputs: 1x 12V, 1x AC (500W)

Reasons to buy

+
Charges in 1.6 hours
+
Extra battery is removable

Reasons to avoid

-
Not the best value for money

If you can’t decide whether you need a grab-and-go portable battery for weekends away or something more substantial, then the EcoFlow River Max is what you need. Uniquely modular, the River Max has a total of 576Wh yet is essentially a chassis upgrade over EcoFlow’s smaller 288Wh-capable River. Rather neatly, the EcoFlow River Max has two 288Wh batteries inside, one of which can be removed if you need something lighter on occasion. 

In either configuration, it’s quick to charge, with EcoFlow’s ‘X-Stream’ using a smart inverter to recharge from 0-80% within an hour and fully charged in just 1.6 hours. You can also increase the AC output to up to 1800W if you need to power a home appliance or DIY tool. Loaded with ins and outs and with a built-in carry handle, cables to charge it while you drive, and the ability to use two 110W solar panels make the EcoFlow River Max an attractive option for short trips off-grid. 

Read our full EcoFlow River Max review.

Best expandable

Bluetti AC500 + B300S review

(Image credit: Jamie Carter)
Best expandable portable power station

Specifications

Capacity: 576Wh
Weight: 7.7kg / 17lbs
Measurements: 289x184x235mm / 11.4x7.3x9.3”
Solar: 200W
Outputs: 1x USB-A fast-charge (18W), 2x USB-A (5V/2.4A), 1 x USB-C (100W), 1x 13.6V cigarette lighter, 2x AC (600W), 2x DC
Inputs: 1x 12V, 1x AC (500W)

Reasons to buy

+
Huge storage capacity 
+
3,072Wh as standard
+
Modular and streamlined design
+
Two wireless charging pads
+
Excellent build quality

Reasons to avoid

-
Very heavy and hard to move
-
Unwieldy cable linking both units
-
Fan can be very loud
-
2x B300S required for 24 hours+ backup

Do you need some serious off-grid power? Highly capable, hugely customisable, and one of the heaviest power stations we’ve ever tested, the Bluetti AC500 + B300S is worth considering in several different guises, depending on your intended use.

With lots of ins and outs, a massive storage capacity and a useful modular design for future expansion, the Bluetti AC500, together with at least one B300S battery, is one of the best portable power stations ready to take on power cuts, outages, motorhomes, serious camping trips, off-grid cabins and glamping sites.

You can add solar panels for total off-grid freedom and upgrade by adding B300S units as you need them, with its 15 outputs – including five or six AC sockets – creating a truly versatile system. Build quality is excellent, and there are built-in handles, but even with its most basic architecture, this two-pronged product is heavy. 

Read our full Bluetti AC500 + B300S review.

Best premium

Goal Zero Yeti 1500X portable power station review

(Image credit: T3)

5. Goal Zero Yeti 1500X

Best premium portable power station

Specifications

Capacity: 1,516Wh (10.8V, 140.4Ah)
Weight: 20.7kg / 45.64lbs
Measurements: 387x260x263mm / 15.25x10.23x10.37”
Solar: 600W
Outputs: 2x AC output, 2x USB-A (5V, 2.4V), 60W PD USB-C, 2x 6mm, 12V car, 2x 12V power ports, 2x Anderson Power Pol (APP)
Inputs: 2x Anderson Power Pol (APP), expansion port, WiFi (2.44Ghz), Bluetooth

Reasons to buy

+
Ultra-huge capacity
+
Exhaustive ins and outs

Reasons to avoid

-
Extremely heavy
-
Overkill for camping weekends

Goal Zero’s flagship portable power station is for committed off-gridders and van-lifers. Huge and heavy, it contains a lithium-ion NMC battery rated at a mighty 1,516W hours. It’s a treasure trove of ins and outs, with highlights including two PD USB-C slots (one 60W to recharge a laptop and one 18W Quick Charge to quickly refuel a phone), a 12V cigarette lighter charger and standard AC.

There’s an excellent LCD display that shows you exactly what it’s up to and what charge remains, and there’s even an app that connects over the Yeti 1500X’s own WiFi network. Capable of charging lights or even a fridge, there are a couple of Anderson inputs that can be hooked up to a maximum of 600W solar panels (though you mustn’t exceed 50V), one of which is underneath a flap on the top that also gives you somewhere to store cables neatly. There are two useful handles on either side of the unit, but all that great stuff means the Yeti 1500X is a very heavy product. 

Read our full Goal Zero Yeti 1500X review.

Best power management

Dabbsson Portable Home Backup Power Station review

(Image credit: Matt Kollat/T3)

6. Dabbsson DBS2300 Portable Home Backup Power Station

Best portable power station for power management

Specifications

Capacity: 2330 Wh
Weight: 53.1lb (24.1kg)
Measurements: W17" x D14"
Solar: 800W
Outputs: 14, 3x USB 2.0, 4x USB-C connections, 1x car charger port, 1x Anderson, 2x DC outputs, 2x AC outputs
Inputs: 4

Reasons to buy

+
Unique semi-solid state battery is safer and lasts longer
+
Modular approach allows for new units to be added later
+
Plenty of outlets to charge multiple household items simultaneously
+
Handy minor features (e.g. built-in flashlight)

Reasons to avoid

-
Solar panel's efficiency is low
-
Not rugged enough for outdoor use

The Dabbsson DBS2300 Portable Home Backup Power Station is a solid choice for home power emergencies, thanks to its unique semi-solid-state battery that enhances safety and longevity.

With ample ports and a modular design, the DBS2300 accommodates multiple devices simultaneously and allows for future expansion. Despite its indoor-oriented build and low solar panel efficiency, it impresses with features like an AI-powered management system, intuitive operation, and a robust app interface.

The unit's LCD screen provides comprehensive information, and you can further scrutinise data using the app, which offers convenient control and monitoring options.

While weatherproofing could be improved, its reliable performance and safety features make it a compelling option for those seeking a dependable backup power solution.

Read our full Dabbsson DBS2300 Portable Home Backup Power Station review.

Best budget

Bluetti PowerOak AC50S

(Image credit: Bluetti)

7. Bluetti PowerOak AC50S

Best budget portable power station

Specifications

Capacity: 500Wh
Weight: 6.2kg / 13.6lbs
Measurements: 259.5x191x196 mm / 16.5x11x15.2”
Solar: 120W
Outputs: 4x USB-A (5V/3A), USB-C PD (45W), 10W wireless charging pad, 1x 12V car cigarette lighter, 2x AC (220-240V 50/60Hz), 3x DC output
Inputs: AC wall charger cable

Reasons to buy

+
Plenty of ins and outs
+
Wireless charging pad

Reasons to avoid

-
Reasonably low capacity
-
No cable management

How much power do you actually need? This entry-level portable power station offers 500Wh, which is about 40 recharges of a smartphone and seven recharges of a laptop. If that sounds enough then there’s a lot to like about this pared-down portable battery, which can cope with 11 devices simultaneously. That can include up to four smartphones cabled-up, but an additional device on the top thanks to the PowerOak AC50S’s unusual provision of a wireless charging pad. 

There’s also an LED lamp on the rear in case you need some light around camp at night. It takes about five hours to recharge the PowerOak AC50S via a PowerOak SP120 solar panel, a wall socket or via a 12V car outlet, the latter making it perfect for a road trip. As a nice bonus you also get a bunch of cables, though there’s nowhere to store them. 

How to choose the best portable power station for you

Portable power stations aren't just bulky batteries; they're the Swiss Army knives of electricity. Need to juice up your laptop with a USB-C PD slot? Piece of cake. Want to plug in your regular wall devices? No sweat. Thinking of going green with solar panels? Well, that depends on the model - some are cooler than others.

Some power stations double as disco balls, thanks to their built-in LED light. And those moulded carry handles? They're like the ergonomic grips on your favourite gaming controller, making it a breeze to go from car boot to campsite.

LED screens that spill the tea on your battery's mood and apps that keep you in the loop—it's like having a personal assistant for your power needs. Just remember, folks, that portability isn't just about size; it's a delicate dance between weight and convenience. So, unless you're cool with wheeling around a mini fridge, choose wisely!

Whether you're rocking UK, US, or EU vibes, there's a power station for you – just make sure you pick the one with the correct outlets.

How we test the best portable power stations

We test the best portable power stations by evaluating their charging capabilities, ensuring they can efficiently refuel various devices, including smartphones and laptops. Compatibility with different plugs, such as USB-C PD slots and Anderson connectors for solar panels, is also assessed.

We scrutinise additional features like built-in LED lights and ergonomic carry handles, which enhance the user experience, especially during camping trips.

We also assess the user interface, focusing on LED screens that display vital information like battery status and charging rates. Smartphone apps, if available, are evaluated for their functionality and convenience in managing the power station remotely.

We analyse the weight and size of each power station to determine their suitability for various travel scenarios, from backpacking adventures to car camping trips.

FAQ

Is it worth getting a portable power station?

Yes, portable power stations are worth it for backup power during emergencies, outdoor activities like camping, and versatility in charging various devices. Advanced features like multiple ports and compatibility with solar panels enhance their convenience. Despite the initial cost, the long-term benefits often outweigh the investment.

What is the difference between a power bank and a portable power station?

The main difference between a power bank and a portable power station lies in their capacity and functionality. Power banks are smaller, designed for charging small devices like smartphones, while portable power stations are larger, capable of powering larger appliances and providing backup power for extended periods, often with multiple output ports and higher capacity batteries.

What will a 1000 watt power station run?

A 1000 watt power station can run various devices depending on their power consumption. It can power smaller devices like smartphones, tablets, laptops, LED lights, fans, and small kitchen appliances such as blenders or coffee makers. However, it may struggle to power larger appliances like refrigerators or microwave ovens for an extended period due to their higher power requirements.

Matt Kollat
Section Editor | Active

Matt Kollat is a journalist and content creator who works for T3.com and its magazine counterpart as an Active Editor. His areas of expertise include wearables, drones, fitness equipment, nutrition and outdoor gear. He joined T3 in 2019. His byline appears in several publications, including Techradar and Fit&Well, and more. Matt also collaborated with other content creators (e.g. Garage Gym Reviews) and judged many awards, such as the European Specialist Sports Nutrition Alliance's ESSNawards. When he isn't working out, running or cycling, you'll find him roaming the countryside and trying out new podcasting and content creation equipment.

With contributions from