Best telescope for stargazing 2022: super scopes for seeing stars

Find the best telescopes around, for all budgets and experience levels

best telescope for stargazing 2022: telescope pointed out of a window at the stars
(Image credit: Getty)

Want to see stars? The best telescopes for stargazing can make the most distant astral bodies feel like they're within touching distance, without you having to leave your back garden. Getting kitted out for this new hobby can be pricey, though, so it makes sense to do your research and ensure you're buying the best telescope for your needs, budget and ability level. 

You might be happy with a straightforward starter scope that'll give you a clear view of the Moon's surface but not much else (in which case you might be better off with our guide to the best telescope for beginners). Or perhaps you have more far-ranging ambitions of looking out into deep space, for which you need an advanced, computerised scope that can help you find astronomical points of interest.

Unsurprisingly, the more advanced telescope will cost you more, but if you're prepared to pay then you'll be rewarded with more flexibility and better results, so you're unlikely to run out of enthusiasm as quickly as you might with a cheaper scope. We'd suggest shelling out for the best telescope you can afford – this is a market in which too much penny-pinching will almost certainly equate to disappointing results.

Once you start reading, you'll notice that there are a lot of Celestron options included here, and with good reason. It's one of the best telescope brands available, with an enormous range models suitable for all experience levels. It's not the only good brand out there though, and you'll find a selection of recommendations in our ranking. Be aware, too, that if you're not fixed on a telescope, you'll find some of today's best binoculars are also suitable for watching the skies – our binoculars vs telescope for stargazing comparison should help you choose.

The best telescopes for stargazing 2022

SkyWatcher Explorer 130M Motorised Newtonian Reflector TelescopeT3 Best Buy badge

(Image credit: SkyWatcher)

1. SkyWatcher Explorer 130M

The best telescope for most people

Specifications

Design: Reflector
Aperture: 5"/130mm
Focal length: 35.4"/900mm
Mount: Equatorial

Reasons to buy

+
Fairly priced and well-built
+
Suitable for a range of abilities
+
Multi-speed handset included

Reasons to avoid

-
Batteries required to run the motor
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Some aspects of the build are plastic-y
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Bulky

Overall, we reckon that the best telescope for most people is the SkyWatcher Explorer 130M Motorised Newtonian Reflector Telescope. This mid-range motorised option is accessible for beginners but with plenty of room to grow into, and delivers a lot for its reasonable price tag. There's a 900mm focal length, f/6.92 aperture and two eyepieces (10mm and 25mm), which will enable you to check out neighbouring planets or gaze into deep space. Customers have managed to access impressively sharp views of the craters on the Moon's surface, alongside Jupiter's moons, Saturn's rings and the Andromeda galaxy.

While this isn't the lightest or most compact telescope, the fully adjustable aluminium tripod is very stable, and general consensus is that setup is pretty straightforward, with two complete novices managing it in around an hour. You should expect a build quality that's great for the price, although understandably not as rugged as more expensive options. 

A multi speed handset enables you to control the 360° slow-motion tracking gears. SkyWatcher claims the flexibility of this telescope's dual metal setting circles allows for the tracking of planets in the night sky by their RA (Right Ascension) and DEC (declination) coordinates, to gives their location in relation to fixed stars (although the jury's out on if this actually works – one reviewer commented that these dials were "largely decorative"). A separate latitude adjustment aids polar alignment – although again, some report difficulty in adjusting this. 

Despite these few niggles, the SkyWatcher Explorer 130M Motorised Newtonian Reflector Telescope comes extremely well reviewed, with consistently high scores and customers impressed with what's delivered for the reasonable price tag. An excellent option for new stargazers and onwards, this one should whet your appetite for further investigation of the Moon – and beyond!

Not sold? Check out some more mid-range all-rounders in our Celestron Inspire 100AZ refractor vs Meade Polaris 114mm reflector telescope face-off. 

Celestron StarSense Explorer 8" Dobsonian telescope in a gardenT3 Approved badge

(Image credit: Jamie Carter / T3)
A powerful manual telescope that's still suitable for beginners

Specifications

Design: Dobsonian Newtonian reflector
Aperture: 8"/203mm
Focal length: 47.24"/1200mm
Mount: Manual alt-azimuth Dobsonian

Reasons to buy

+
Easy to align
+
Super sharp views
+
Great value

Reasons to avoid

-
Big and heavy

A quick look at the Celestron StarSense Explorer 8-inch Dobsonian's specs should be enough to put off inexperienced astronomers; its 8-inches/203 mm aperture is the sort of thing you'd only go for after a few years of studying the night sky, and the fact that it's manually operated should mean that it's a nightmare to operate. But no, we're here to tell you that this is a staggeringly good telescope for beginners, and indeed anyone who wants an amazingly sharp view of the night sky without paying an arm and a leg for the privilege.

Its Dobsonian design (see our explainer of the different telescope types for an explanation) delivers a lot of light in a reasonably compact package, but what really changes everything is Celestron's fantastic StarSense app, which brings your phone into play and makes it astonishingly easy for even a fresh-faced newbie to find celestial bodies. It's not exactly cheap, but you get stacks of performance for your money, and the views you'll get from this telescope are incredible. Find out all about it in our Celestron StarSense Explorer 8" Dobsonian telescope review.

Celestron 22203 AstroFi 130 Wireless Reflecting TelescopeT3 Approved badge

(Image credit: Celestron)

3. Celestron 22203 AstroFi 130 Wireless

An excellent Wi-Fi-enabled, app-controlled telescope

Specifications

Design: Newtonian Reflector
Aperture: 5"/130mm
Focal length: 25.5"/650mm
Mount: Alt-Azimuth

Reasons to buy

+
High-tech but easy to use
+
Stable and lightweight
+
Comes with accessory tray and eyepieces

Reasons to avoid

-
Scope can't be removed from tripod
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On-board Wi-Fi can be unreliable
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Some plastic-y elements to the build

For a high tech stargazing solution that won't cost you an absolute fortune, we'd point you at the Celestron 22203 AstroFi 130 Wireless Reflecting Telescope. This scope comes with integrated Wi-Fi and is designed to be controlled with a phone or tablet, via Celestron's free SkyPortal app. Although a few reviewers have found the Wi-Fi a little temperamental, generally this succeeds in its task of making it super-easy to find the heavenly bodies you're looking for.

Aiming to provide clear views of the Moon and the planets beyond, the Celestron 22203 AstroFi features a large 130mm lens and a field of view that's wide enough to take in even the largest deep-sky objects. Additionally, it helpfully comes supplied with an accessory tray for stashing your biscuits in, and more importantly two 1.25-inch eyepieces. Slightly annoyingly, this telescope cannot be removed from tripod, should you want to use it as a desktop device.

A rubber-lined area is designed to hold miscellaneous accessories including your smartphone or small tablet, presumably having first downloaded the app, which replaces the need for a remote control handset, thus streamlining the whole operation. The user holds their smart device up to the night sky and, upon locating an object they want to view, it's simply a case of tapping the screen, whereby the telescope automatically zeroes in on the object and the screen displays information about it. You can even generate a 'sky tour' of the best celestial objects to view, based on time and location. Clever stuff.

Not quite right for you? Check out our Orion SkyView Pro 8 GoTo vs Celestron Nexstar 8SE showdown for two more top-end options. 

Celestron AstroMaster 102AZ beginner telescope in a gardenT3 Approved badge

(Image credit: Gavin Stoker)
A budget priced telescope for fledgling stargazers

Specifications

Design: Refractor
Aperture: 4-inch
Focal length: 660mm
Mount: Altazimuth

Reasons to buy

+
Terrestrial as well as astrological viewing
+
Large objective lens and generous focal length
+
Tripod, software and manual included

Reasons to avoid

-
Heavy at 6.4kg
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Screws loosen easily

If you're just getting started with stargazing, the Celestron AstroMaster 102AZ is an affordable scope that packs enough features to keep you going as your experience and skills grow. In our Celestron AstroMaster 102AZ review, our tester was very impressed with the viewing possibilities this telescope affords – the enormous 102mm objective lens combined with an impressive 606mm focal length deliver detailed, ultra-bright views of the Moon, but also the visual clout to see Saturn's rings and Jupiter's moons (although our tester noted that for more deep-space viewing, they would prefer a higher specced option still). The altazimuth mount and pan handle setup are ideal for finding objects in the night sky, but it can also be used to look at Earth-based objects if you prefer.

The bundle includes a steel tripod, accessory tray and manual, alongside 10mm and 20mm eyepieces, a red dot finder scope and Starry Night astronomy software, making for a sound starter package. It's also pretty simple to set up from scratch without the need for tools, bar a Philips screwdriver. On the downside, this AstroMaster is a bit of a beast, weighing in at 6.4kg and sporting a large footprint that means you'll need to have a bit of space at your disposal. 

Not right for you? We compare two alternative beginners' telescopes in our Celestron 21039 PowerSeeker 50AZ vs National Geographic Refractor 60/700 AZ showdown.

Celestron StarSense Explorer DX 130AZT3 Approved badge

(Image credit: Jamie Carter)
A beginner's scope that doesn't hold your hand too much

Specifications

Design: Newtonian reflector
Aperture: 130mm
Focal length: 650mm
Mount: manual alt-az

Reasons to buy

+
Easy to set up and align
+
Sharp images
+
All-in one package

Reasons to avoid

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Not for astrophotography
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Manual slewing

While the Celestron StarSense Explorer DX 130AZ is very much a beginner's telescope, it's one that requires a little more effort than the average starter scope to get results, and when you do they're totally worth it. While this telescope comes with a companion app to help you find what you're looking for, it won't automatically point at them for you; this is a completely manual telescope that you'll need to point in the right direction yourself using its manual alt-azimuth mount, guided by helpful arrows in the app, and you'll need to keep adjusting it so that objects stay in view.

This might prove challenging to newcomers (especially considering that its Newtonian reflector shows you everything upside-down), but once you're focused and looking the right way, the results are impressive. Even with its basic eyepieces you'll get sharp, colourful results, and if you like what you see you'll do even better with upgrade eyepieces or a Barlow lens. If you're into stargazing for the long haul, this is a scope that'll teach you skills that a more automated scope won't; find out more in our Celestron StarSense Explorer DX 130AZ telescope review.

Celestron 11069 Nexstar 8SE TelescopeT3 Approved badge

(Image credit: Celestron)

6. Celestron Nexstar 8SE Compound Telescope

A hi-tech telescope

Specifications

Design: Schmidt-Cassegrain
Aperture: 8"/203mm
Focal length: 80"/2,032mm
Mount: Alt-Azimuth

Reasons to buy

+
On-board computer does the hard work
+
Portable in comparison to others

Reasons to avoid

-
Expensive for a hobbyist
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Heavy going for new stargazers
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Included software a bit dated

The Nexstar 8SE is one of Celestron’s high-end computerised devices, which means it does the hard work for you. After a 5-minute setup each session, you can type a target into the side-mounted keypad, and the Nexstar will find it for you, from a library of more than 40,000 celestial objects (if you want to be able to search for objects on your smartphone rather than having to remember their names, you can upgrade with Celestron's Skyportal WiFi module (opens in new tab)). For those new to astronomy, it provides a really quick and easy way to start finding your way around the night sky.

There's a large 8-inch aperture and good light-gathering ability, delivering a clear view of many deep space objects. It's not the most compact telescope on the market, but does pack down to a reasonable size – and there are smaller 6-inch and 4-inch models of this same telescope (with a smaller price tag to match), if you're really wanting to slim down. 

The supplied tripod is fairly sturdy, and for short viewing sessions, some reviewers note that in can also just be used on a tabletop, without the tripod. One potential annoyance to be aware of for more advanced users is that while you can rotate it vertically manually, you can't pan it left and right without using the motor and keypad. However, there's still plenty to recommend this impressive high-tech telescope. 

Bresser Taurus 90 NG telescopeT3 Approved badge

(Image credit: Bresser)

7. Bresser Taurus 90 NG telescope

A decent option for hobbyists

Specifications

Design: Achromatic refractor
Aperture: 90mm
Focal length: 900mm
Mount: multi purpose; allows for both terrestrial and astronomical use

Reasons to buy

+
strong aluminium construction
+
Smartphone mount for picture taking
+
Generous focal length and large, bright lens

Reasons to avoid

-
Weighty at 7.5kg combined

Aimed at both beginners and hobbyists, the Bresser Taurus 90 NG is an aluminium telescope that offers an enticing combination of performance and value for money. With a 900mm focal length and 90mm objective lens, it's ideal for getting a close look at the Moon and planets, and with a full aperture solar filter you can see the surface of the Sun in impressive detail. It's also perfect for taking photos, thanks to its included smartphone mount. Two eyepieces – a 20mm and 4mm – are included, and thanks to a supplied Barlow lens that increases the magnification of each eyepiece by a factor of three, maximum magnification is the equivalent of a whopping 675x. Thankfully, a tripod is supplied as standard. A mirror type set up provides an upright image.

While the above all sounds great, one downside is that despite its aluminium construction, the Bresser Taurus 90 NG's combined weight is a hefty 7.5kg. Still, the fact that the set up can be used in altazimuth mode for terrestrial observations, and then in equatorial mode for astrological use provides a degree of versatility lacking in other options in our best telescope list.

Skywatcher Evostar-90 telescopeT3 Approved badge

(Image credit: Skywatcher)

8. Skywatcher Evostar-90 telescope

Another quality telescope that's suitable for beginners and beyond

Specifications

Design: Achromatic refractor
Aperture: 90mm
Focal length: 900mm
Mount: equatorial

Reasons to buy

+
Long focal length 
+
Multi coated objective lens to improve light transmission

Reasons to avoid

-
Necessarily quite a bulky setup

With similar specs to the Bresser Taurus 90 MG, including the same 900mm focal length and 90mm lens, the Skywatcher Evostar-90 is another great choice for beginners as well as more experienced stargazers. Capable of bringing distant heavenly bodies into sharp focus, if you want to take a closer look a the surface of the Moon and other planets, this one's an excellent choice.

The Evostar-90 comes with a tripod made from lightweight aluminium, with an accessory tray provided for stashing the supplied 1.25-inch 10mm and 25mm eyepieces when not in use. On top of this are the regular features of a multi-coated objective lens to improve light transmission, a finderscope to more accurately pinpoint points of interest in the night sky, and a construction quality that aims to deliver a lifetime of viewing. Be aware, that large objective lens and decent focal length necessitates a physically larger set up than you might be expecting.

Unistellar eVscope eQuinoxT3 Approved badge

(Image credit: Unistellar)
See deep-sky objects in stunning detail with this super-smart telescope

Specifications

Design: Reflector
Aperture: 4.5"/114mm
Focal length: 17.7"/450mm
Mount: Motorised Alt-Azimuth

Reasons to buy

+
Easy to set up
+
Incredible views

Reasons to avoid

-
Slow to focus
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FOV too small for the Moon
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No conventional eyepiece option

If the notion of peering into an eyepiece to look at stars seems quaintly old-fashioned to you, Unistellar's eVscope eQuinox (opens in new tab) could be the telescope you're looking for (as long as you have a suitably enormous budget). There's no eyepiece; it connects wirelessly to your phone or tablet via an app, and enables you to see the heavens directly on your screen, complete with built-in image processing so that you get a much clearer picture than you would by looking directly into an eyepiece.

It uses live light accumulation to fix on a tiny point in space and build up images of deep sky objects in impressive detail, albeit eventually. It can take a good few minutes for 'live' image to feed through to your device, but once it does you'll find it's been well worth the wait. And as an added bonus, the Unistellar app has a built-in catalogue of 5,400 objects, making it easy for absolute beginners to quickly find obscure ring nebulae and spiral galaxies to look at.

So what are the down-sides? This high-end telescope has a high-end price tag to match, and the field of view is so narrow that it can't take in the whole of the Moon in one go. But if you want to see into the depths of space, even from a light-polluted back garden, this oddball telescope's well worth the investment; find out more in our Unistellar eVscope eQuinox smart telescope review.

Skywatcher Mercury 705 telescopeT3 Approved badge

(Image credit: Skywatcher)

10. Skywatcher Mercury 705 telescope

A great grab-and-go, budget option

Specifications

Design: Achromatic refractor
Aperture: 70mm
Focal length: 500mm
Mount: Azimuth

Reasons to buy

+
Long focal length and large lens
+
Multi coated objective lens to improve light transmission
+
Grab-and-go setup

Reasons to avoid

-
There are more powerful (but bulkier) alternatives

For a more compact, straightforward telescope that still has plenty of potential for seeing the skies in detail, the Skywatcher Mercury 705 is an excellent option. With a 500mm focal length and 70mm objective lens it packs a lot into a smaller package, and there's a multi-coated objective lens to improve light transmission. It comes with an alt-azimuth mount, tripod and accessory tray as standard, along with a pair of 1.25-inch sized 10mm and 25mm magnifying eyepieces. 

Viewing is at a comfortable 45° and the image through the eyepiece is presented the correct way up. Once again the construction here is from lightweight yet sturdy aluminium. In other words this one ticks most of the boxes we could hope for, for the asking price. There are inevitably higher powered alternatives for a similar price if you don’t mind a physically bigger footprint, though. 

Orion SpaceProbe IIT3 Approved badge

(Image credit: Orion)

11. Orion SpaceProbe II

Another excellent telescope for fledgling stargazers

Specifications

Design: Reflector
Aperture: 3"
Focal length: 700mm
Mount: Equatorial

Reasons to buy

+
Beginner friendly
+
Affordable

Reasons to avoid

-
More eyepieces would be useful
-
Red dot sight for aiming requires batteries

There's a lot to recommend the Orion SpaceProbe II if you're after a capable telescope to get you started with stargazing. It has 76mm objective lens that'll provide plenty of detail in the dark, plus a 25mm eyepiece that delivers 28x magnification and a 10mm eyepiece that'll give you 70x magnification. It gets even better, though, thanks to a 2X Barlow lens that'll double the magnification of both eyepieces; it might have been better to include more eyepieces, but we're quite happy with this arrangement.

While most starter scopes are suitable for viewing the Moon and not a great deal more, when the eyepieces are combined with the SpaceProbe II's core 700mm focal length, users say they've been able to explore further planets, bright nebulas and star clusters. The scope also comes with both a Star Target 'planisphere', Moon Map and beginners' guide book to direct our gaze heavenwards. 

To save us fumbling around in the dark, a mini flashlight is further included in the kit, while the provided tripod allows for slow and steady tracking of objects of interest. In short there's enough here to quickly get amateur stargazers conducting their own deep space 'probes' straight out of the box. Look out for the version that provides an upgraded Equatorial or 'EQ' mount rather than the Altazimuth mount of earlier versions.

Celestron 31045 AstroMaster 130EQ Reflector TelescopeT3 Approved badge

12. Celestron AstroMaster 130EQ

A highly capable telescope for taking on camping trips

Specifications

Design: Refractor
Aperture: 2.7"/70mm
Focal length: 15.7"/400mm
Mount: Alt-Azimuth

Reasons to buy

+
Provides fantastically clear images
+
Good-sized aperture
+
A no-tool set-up process
+
Lightweight and portable

Reasons to avoid

-
Stability of the mount and tripod could be better
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Higher powered eyepieces would be useful
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Setup can be confusing

Looking for a telescope that you can take with you on camping trips so that you can enjoy the stars with less light pollution obscuring your view? While the Celestron AstroMaster 130EQ is large and sturdy, it's a telescope that doesn't require tools to set up and it's easy to pack away, which makes it a good choice as a travel companion. A budget option aimed at beginners, this telescope has everything you need to get started: a 10mm and 20mm eyepiece, a StarPointer red dot finderscope and free astronomy software to teach you the basics. The telescope has an Equatorial Mount, which allows you to track objects smoothly as they move across the sky, providing bright, clear images of the Moon, planets, and star clusters. On the down-side, higher powered eyepieces than the ones provided would be a distinct advantage, and this telescope is only really suitable for basic astrophotography. 

Svbony SV25 Refractor TelescopeT3 Approved badge

(Image credit: Svbony)

13. Svbony SV25 Refractor Telescope

A good small telescope for stargazing newbies

Specifications

Design: Refractor
Aperture: 60mm
Focal length: 420mm
Mount: fixed

Reasons to buy

+
Light and portable
+
Super easy set-up

Reasons to avoid

-
Stability of tripod could be improved
-
Unsuitable for viewing further than the Moon

For absolute newbies this is a great little telescope. the Svbony SV25 Refractor Telescope is small and easy to get started with, and it's just the thing to give anyone just starting out the confidence to explore the skies before graduating to a more advanced device.

This 60mm aperture refractor telescope comes with an adjustable aluminium tripod, which can keep the scope stable as you stargaze, as well as a phone mount adapter so you can easily take photos and videos of what you spot in the sky. Because it’s an entry-level telescope aimed mainly at kids, it’s good for looking at the Moon, closer objects and even land objects, but you’ll need a more advanced scope to be able to see other objects in the night sky in more detail. 

How to choose the best telescope for you

Trying to find the best telescope can feels a little daunting. With so many options to choose from, and all the extras and accessories that go with them, it's all too easy to feel paralysed by choice. You'll find a more in-depth break-down of what to look for in our guide to how to choose your first telescope, but broadly, you want to ask yourself three key questions to quickly narrow down the options:

  • What do you want to be able to see?
  • How much do you want to spend?
  • How much room do you have? 

For the first, the relevant spec is focal length, because this dictates how far into space the telescope can reach. Roughly, shorter focal lengths are fine for observing the moon, but you'll need a greater focal length if you want to get into deep space. However, you should also factor in extra magnification provided by the eyepieces. Pricier telescopes will comes with interchangeable eyepieces offering different magnification factors. These can be used to increase the distances your telescope can reach to. 

The latter two are self-explanatory – shop within your assigned budget, and check out the size to make sure you have space to store your scope. On that final point, you'll also want to factor in where you'll use your telescope. Most telescopes will need to be used outside – you won't get a great view if you just point one out of your window because light pollution (and even the heat from your home) will affect your view. So bear that in mind when considering portability and ease of set-up. Also consider if you'll want to be able to attach a stills or video camera to be able to record what you see, as you see it. 

There are three types of telescope: reflectors, refractors, and catadioptric or compound telescopes. They each have a different kind of lens set-up, which means they provide different results. Perhaps the most common type for astronomical telescopes is the refractor, but typically the alternative of the reflecting telescope allows for larger apertures – and therefore a greater amount of light to be collected, translating as a brighter image. The rough rule of thumb when it comes to optics is brighter is always better.

If you're brand new to stargazing, you might also want to check out our guides to how to set up a telescope.

How we tested these telescopes

Wherever possible, our stargazing specialists have called in samples of these telescopes and spent time putting them through their paces at home. In these cases, we've also put together full-length reviews that dig into how the product performed in more detail. These are linked to in the blurb of the product. We consider things like the features on offer, how easy it is to set up, the handling and operation. We'll also compare it to other similarly-priced and similarly specced alternatives on the market, to see if it's the strongest recommendation in that particular area.

Where we haven't been able to get our hands on a test sample to try out, we make an informed decision based on the specs offered for the price, our experience with that brand, and other customer reviews available.

For our best telescope ranking, we've focused on offering a range of options for different priorities and at different price points. You won't find a list of just the highest-specced and priciest models, but a variety of different kinds of telescope to suit different people. 

Black Friday telecope deals: when's the best time to buy? 

Traditionally, the Black Friday sales are a great time to pick up a quality telescope at a cut price, and we'd ideally expect the same for Black Friday 2022 when November rolls round. Although really, it's getting increasingly hard to predict anything with confidence these days, so let's just say we have our fingers crossed. On a 'normal' year, while the best offers are usually concentrated on Black Friday and Cyber Monday proper, we've been seeing deals going live early, and in 2021 some of the biggest deals were in the run-up to the actual event. That means it's worth keeping an eye out in the preceding week or so. 

In 2021, we saw a number of strong deals – in the US especially – on some of today's best telescopes. Good places to shop included Amazon, Wex Photo Video, and Walmart.

Rewind to the previous years and the picture wasn't quite so rosy – the 2020 Black Friday telescope deals were woefully thin on the ground, both in the US and the UK, likely as a result of stock shortages.

The other major shopping event to take note of is Amazon Prime Day. The 2021 event took place in June, and we saw one great beginner telescope deal in the UK – the EMARTH refractor telescope (opens in new tab) dropped by 44% for Prime subscribers, taking it down to less than £60. 

In 2020, the event got shifted to October on account of the pandemic, and there were some decent discounts on Celestron telescopes as well as binoculars and sporting scopes. 

We'll be keeping a close eye out for any price drops that do occur, and our dedicated tool will pull in all the cheapest prices on the products in our ranking at all times, so you can be sure you're not overpaying.

Gavin Stoker
Gavin Stoker

Gavin Stoker has been writing about photography and technology for the past 20 years. He currently edits the trade magazine British Photographic Industry News - BPI News for short - which is a member of TIPA, the international Technical Imaging Press Association.

With contributions from