Console controllers that innovated our gaming

From the Wiimote to the Atari 2600 joystick, T3 unveils the top console controllers that changed the way we play games

So the PS4 is official albeit without any sight of the console itself, but we did get to see some pretty images of the PS4 controller and the improved PlayStation Move setup at least. With redesigned shoulder buttons, a Share button and a touchpad interface amongst the new features it looks more of evolutionary than a revolutionary which might keep fans of the Dualshock happy.

There's no sign of an Xbox 720 reveal just yet but with a more intuitive version of its Kinect motion controller expected, a redesign of the physical controller is probably not out of the question either. As we wait to see whether Microsoft changes up its controllers as well, we've plugged the iconic controllers back in and see how they revolutionized the way we roamed around those pixelated lands.

 

Atari 2600 joystick

As Disco burned the airwaves and the dance floors, these rubbery joystick numbers helped welcome gaming into our homes on a truly global scale. The digital joystick with 2-axis (well, three if you twisted the stick around a bit) also hosted just that single orange 'fire' button. On the face of it, it was a plain a controller as you are going to see, but it was more than capable in handling the entire 2D game back catalogue, which helped fuel the Atari addiction for the first swarm of bedroom gamers.

 

Gamecube controller

One of the few things Ninty managed to get right with their sixth generation console offering, this wing-shaped controller boasted both analog and digital controls. Led by that chunky green button, it was certainly a different take on the usual layouts.

The battery-powered Rumble Pak from the N64 got the chop, with all the vibrating goodness supplied separately. The shoulder buttons had both digital and analog properties, helping to include additional buttons without actually physically adding to the pad.

A special mention should go to the Wavebird, a wireless variation of the original controller which is compatible with the Nintendo Wii.

 

Megadrive controller

Featuring three less buttons than its 16-bit rival, this rounded gamepad was a staple diet for those indulging in hefty Streets of Rage sessions. Chunkier than the SNES controller, it was in fact lighter in comparison, therefore more liable to be flung out of your hands while you busy yourself taking down a criminal syndicate.

When Street Fighter 2 and Mortal Kombat reared their multi-combo heads, the need for more buttons was clearly in need. Sega duly released a six-button controller in 1993 leaving all those deprived of enjoying the delights of Capcom and Midway's fighting classics finally able to memorize those intricate button combinations.

 

N64 controller

Arriving in all the colours of the rainbow, it was the first game controller to include both an analog control and haptic feedback by way of the Rumble Pak.

The three-pronged design meant you could hold the control in three different ways. The pad featured 8 action buttons with a "Z trigger" hidden underneath the pad a particularly well positioned addition.

Due to the influx of 3D gaming, the analog stick was a welcome inclusion, using optical sensors to determine the position of the stick, allowing you to roam without the restrictiveness of the D-pad.

 

NES controller

Host to many a retro t-shirts across the land, this rectangular gamepad specimen was by no means ergonomic, but it was all the same a key player in the evolution of the games controller. Along with imprinting its corners into your palms, the NES controller was much slimmer than previous home gaming offerings.

Interestingly, the iconic red circle buttons we came to cherish, did in fact begin life as squares, but due to the fact that they kept getting caught in the casing, they were swiftly replaced.

 

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