Advanced induction hob + dehumidifying extractor x Italian style = Falmec Sintesi

Flexzone induction hob mated with advanced air filtration for the ultimate in kitchen minimalism

Falmec Sintesi has an induction hob with four 'Flexzones'

Italian maestros of air wrangling, Falmec, wowed us this year with Bellaria, an air purifier that pulled off the unlikely feat of being nice to look at, rather than resembling a dustbin with lights on

Its main product line, however, is kitchen extractor fans, and its latest – the Falmec Sintesi – comes as a seamless, all-in-one package with a similarly fetching induction hob.

There's no doubt that Venice's Falmec has played a Venetian blinder here (sorry). The Sintesi is a classic all-in-one for kitchen islands and those who value sleek minimalism. 

Fire up the extractor from the front-mounted controls and its air blades whir open, to suck in up to 600 cubic metres of air per hour (with the boost function engaged). The unique Carbon.Zeo filter doesn't just purify the air, it also helps to 'dramatically' reduce moisture and odours. 

That's because, as well as the usual activated charcoal filter, there is a layer of the mineral zeolite, which has 'high absorption capacity for organic compounds and water vapours'. It's like a kind of mineral sponge.

The induction hob part of the Sintesi is the first to pack four cooking zones into a 900mm surface area' – the norm is three. They're also Flexzones, which means that not only are they bridged together, so heat's transferred to your entire pan base, no matter how big or weirdly shaped it may be, but also that heat is only transferred to the bottom of the pan.

The Sintesi is primarily intended as a recirculation extractor – ie, the air is filtered and put back, rather than being sucked through vents to the exterior of your house. This makes it much easier to install. The space-saving and versatile design also has its motor at the back of the unit, unlike some competitors which house it underneath. You can opt to use it as a ducted extractor if you wish, however.

The extractor has nine speed levels and a boost function, with resultant noise levels from 66 DBA down to a very peaceable 47 DBA. It's rated A++ for energy efficiency.

The Falmec Sintesi costs from £3,143. UK distribution is exclusive to Euroline.  (opens in new tab)

Duncan has been writing about tech for almost 15 years, during which time he has attended every event going, apart from Apple ones, as he mysteriously doesn't get invited to them. He has covered everything from smartphones to headphones, TV to AC and air fryers to the movies of James Bond and obscure anime. 

Duncan's current brief is everything to do with the home and kitchen, which is good because he is an excellent cook, if he says so himself. He also covers cycling and ebikes – like over-using italics, this is another passion of his. Duncan also edits T3's golf section because fuck it, someone has to. Dave Usher does all the real work on that bit, though. In his long and varied lifestyle-tech career he is one of the few people to have been a fitness editor despite being unfit and a cars editor for not one but two websites, despite being unable to drive. He also has about 400 vacuum cleaners, and is possibly the UK's leading expert on cordless vacuum cleaners, despite being decidedly messy. A cricket fan for over 30 years, he also recently become T3's cricket editor, writing about how to stream obscure T20 tournaments, and turning out some typically no-nonsense opinions on the world's top teams and players.

Before T3, Duncan was a music and film reviewer, worked for a magazine about gambling that employed a surprisingly large number of convicted criminals, and then a magazine called Bizarre that was essentially like a cross between Reddit and DeviantArt, before the invention of the internet. There was also a lengthy period where he essentially wrote all of T3 magazine every month for about 3 years. 

A broadcaster, raconteur and public speaker, Duncan used to be on telly loads, but an unfortunate incident put a stop to that, so he now largely contents himself with telling people, "I used to be on the TV, you know."