The Steam Deck 2 is going to be better, but it won't be faster

Valve is doing a Nintendo, focusing on visuals and smoothness rather than sheer performance

Steam Deck review
(Image credit: Future / Katie Watkins)

We love the Steam Deck. In our Steam Deck review we praised its smoothness, its ease of use and its excellent balance of power and portability. But technology and our expectations of it don't stay still, and many of us are already hankering after an even better version. Which is why Valve is already working on the Steam Deck 2.

In a fascinating and wide-ranging interview with The Verge (opens in new tab), Valve has explained its plans and priorities for Steam – and with the Steam Deck 2, those priorities don't include a significantly faster processor. Valve reckons the Steam Deck is already powerful enough, so like Nintendo with the Nintendo Switch its focus is on other areas of the experience.

Why you need this particular DualSense charger

This isn't just about buying the brand name. There's a real difference between the Sony dual charger and many of the other ones on the market, not just in terms of how it looks but in terms of how it works. Many chargers want you to stick a dongle into your controllers that in turn connects to the charger; in my experience they're incredibly flimsy and the life expectancy in a home with kids is measured in weeks rather than months or years.

With the Sony there are no dongles; you simply put the controllers into the charger until you feel it gently click into place. And that's it. And unlike many third party controllers they don't wobble and disconnect easily; once the controllers are in, they're in. So if you're looking for a great accessory for yourself or as a gift for a PlayStation owner, I reckon this is ideal.

Carrie Marshall

Writer, musician and broadcaster Carrie Marshall has been covering technology since 1998 and is particularly interested in how tech can help us live our best lives. Her CV is a who’s who of magazines, newspapers, websites and radio programmes ranging from T3, Techradar and MacFormat to the BBC, Sunday Post and People’s Friend. Carrie has written thirteen books, ghost-wrote two more and co-wrote another seven books and a Radio 2 documentary series. When she’s not scribbling, she’s the singer in Glaswegian rock band HAVR (havrmusic.com (opens in new tab)).