How to get a free Amazon Prime account for Amazon Prime Day

Get all the benefits of being an Amazon Prime member without paying for an account

free Amazon Prime account
(Image credit: Amazon)

Despite Amazon Prime Day being in October last year, this year Prime Day is returning to its traditional July spot. And guess what, Amazon Prime Day is here! It started at one minute past midnight last night (Tuesday, July 12) and runs right the way through until the end of Wednesday, July 13.

Amazon says that millions of items will be reduced and promises particularly good deals on Echo smart speakers and other Alexa-enabled devices. We're tracking all the early deals in our best Amazon Prime Day deals article, which will be kept updated throughout the sale period to help you get the best bargains.

To be eligible to snap up the Prime Day bargains, Amazon wants you to have an Amazon Prime account, at the cost of £79 a year in the UK or $119 a year in the US. But what if you want to get Amazon Prime Day prices but you don't want to pay for a Prime account? Read on...

What is Amazon Prime?

A core part of Amazon's business strategy, Prime gives you 'free' next-day delivery on loads of products across the range available at the retailer, no matter how big or small. We say 'free', because you do pay for a Prime subscription (unless you follow our advice), but you don't have to pay for each individual delivery. In current times, the ability to get things delivered almost immediately, no matter what size, has become more useful and important than ever just on its own.

On top of that, you get access to Amazon's music and movie/TV streaming services, and gaming fans will be delighted to get free games and a free subscription in the Twitch game streaming service.

Prime Membership costs money: £79 a year in the UK or $119 a year in the US. As noted, for that fee, you get unlimited one-day delivery on your orders, access to Amazon Prime Instant Video, regular deals for Prime subscribers and you will be able to take advantage of the discounts offered on Amazon Prime Day and Black Friday 2020.

We think that the many benefits of Prime membership make that annual fee worth paying, but what if you just want to try Prime without paying for it? Like, for instance, during the 2020 Amazon Prime Day sales period?

That's easy, read on...

Get Amazon Prime free for 30 days

Amazon offers all new customers a free 30-day trial of Amazon Prime which is way longer than you'll need if you just want to snap up the Prime Day deals. So not only will you get the deals you're after, but you'll have a full month of free one-day Amazon deliveries plus all the other benefits that Prime members enjoy.

You can cancel at any time during your free trial and you won't be charged a penny. Ready to grab your free trial? Hit the links below.

Get your free Amazon Prime US trial (opens in new tab)

Get your free Amazon Prime UK trial (opens in new tab)

When should you sign up for your one-month Amazon Prime trial?

Amazon Prime Day is happening on October 13th and 14th, but the Amazon Prime Day deals have actually started already, so if you want to take advantage of anything you see now, you'll need to jump in right away!

The month-long trial will easily last you through the main Prime Day period, then, and you can grab any early or late deals as well as that happens on the main two days.

With Prime Day's main dates coming about six weeks before Black Friday, there's no way to use your month-long trial to cover both events, sadly… that is, unless you're a student, or otherwise quality for a student trial.

Students don't need to worry about such precise timings because their free trial lasts a whole six months! Read on…

Get Amazon Prime free for six months

If you're a student, you're in luck, because Amazon is offering you a free six-month Amazon Prime trial. After that, should you decide not to cancel, then Prime Student will cost you just £3.99 a month.

And if you do decide to cancel, that six-month free trial period means you'll be able to use your Prime account to get free deliveries up to the end of 2020, covering that important Christmas shopping period, before you pull the plug.

Get your free Amazon Prime UK student account (opens in new tab)

Check out the Deals of the Day at Amazon (opens in new tab)

Share someone else's Prime benefits

If someone in your household has a free Amazon Prime trial or a paid Amazon Prime account then they can share certain Amazon Prime benefits with one other adult (it could be you!) by forming an Amazon Household.

Prime benefits that can be shared with the other adult in your Amazon Household include:

  • Prime Delivery
  • Prime Now
  • Amazon Fresh delivery
  • Prime Video (streaming only)
  • Prime Reading
  • Prime Wardrobe
  • Prime Early Access
  • Prime-Exclusive items
  • Prime Live Events, Premium Seating, and Pre-Sale tickets on Amazon
  • Prime-exclusive pricing on Amazon Music Unlimited and Kindle Fire for Kids Unlimited subscriptions

To set up an Amazon Household, go to the Amazon Household (opens in new tab)  page.

For someone in your household to share their Prime benefits, they'll need to visit their Amazon Prime account (opens in new tab) page. On this page, under Share your Prime Benefits, they can invite you by clicking the Invite someone now button. They can then enter your name and email address in the appropriate fields and click Invite. You will need to know the invitee's date of birth to accept the invitation.

Spencer Hart
Style and Travel Editor

As the Style and Travel Editor at T3, Spencer covers everything from clothes to cars and watches to hotels. Everything that's cool, stylish, and interesting, basically. He's been a part of T3 for over seven years, and in that time covered every industry event known to man, from CES and MWC to the Geneva Motorshow and Baselworld. When he's driving up and down the country in search of the greatest driving roads, he can be found messing around on an electric scooter, playing with luxury watches, or testing the latest fragrances.

With contributions from
  • Global Digital Editorial Strategy Director, Future