Nintendo 2DS review

Nintendo 2DS review

T3 4
  • The Nintendo 2DS is a great entry-level handheld that offers a gateway into Nintendo’s superb DS and 3DS games catalogues. T3 went in for a closer look

    Nintendo 2DS review

    Love

    • Cheap price
    • Amazing games
    • Durable design

    Hate

    • Needs a case
    • Least elegant DS platform
    • No 3D

    The Nintendo 2DS is aimed squarely at two types of people: Nintendo fanboys (and girls) and consumers (and their kids) who have always been curious about Nintendo’s handheld platforms, but could never justify plonking down the money for one of them.

    The former will probably buy it to satiate their Nintendo leanings the month it’s released. For the latter, the 2DS offers a cheap, no frills entry into one of the best gaming catalogues on the planet.

    Nintendo 2DS: Design

    The Nintendo 2DS bears only a passing resemblance to its DS predecessors. While the vibrant colour scheme is present and correct, the iconic clam-shell structure is gone, as is the sleek matte (Nintendo DSi) and glossy (Nintendo 3DS) finish.

    The surface of the console’s plastic casing is rough to the touch and feels quite cheap. The 2DS is also flat and not very sleek – rather it feels like a budget gaming slab.

    That having been said, you can’t pinch an inch on its functionality. The 2DS offers the exact same interface as any other Nintendo DS; one thumbstick, a D-pad, four face buttons, two shoulder buttons, a Start button, a Select button and a Home stud tucked in below the second (lower) screen.

    There’s a slot for a memory card – a 4GB card comes bundled with the device – a recharge jack, a headphone jack and a stylus, that slides into the a slot on the device’s reverse side. The 2DS also has a forward-facing camera and a 2-lens camera on its back that’s capable of taking 3D pictures – even though the console isn’t capable of displaying them in 3D.

    Nintendo 2DS: Display

    Along with its less compact design, the lack of a 3D screen is – as its name suggests – the 2DS’s most notable drawback. Granted the 3DS’s catalogue is perfectly playable in 2D and, but for the exception of Super Mario 3D Land – one of the few titles in which 3D is a plus – the 2DS is an absolutely adequate platform to play them on.

    Owners also need to head into the console’s main menu to take it offline – there’s no handy side-slider to turn off the console’s Wi-Fi – and it only boasts one speaker.

    The 2DS, it seems, is best enjoyed with a pair of headphones. We’re also uncertain about how durable the twin screens are; we didn’t feel comfortable submitting the loaned unit to a rigorous knock-about commute to work. It’s probably a safe bet to suggest that picking up a case for the 2DS is a must.

    Nintendo 2DS: Games

     

    The console’s trump card, though, is the catalogue of games it allows one to play. Even without 3D capabilities – which, admittedly, in most 3DS games is just a gimmick – the 2Ds is worth recommending to anyone who hasn’t yet samples the delights of the DS library.

    Luigi’s Mansion 2, Fire Emblem, Donkey Kong Country 3D, Animal Crossing: A New Leaf – the last four months of 3DS releases alone are enough to justify the 2DS’s £109 price tag. And that’s before one delves into the likes of Professor Layton, Hotel Dusk, Pokemon and the vast array of Mario titles available for the device.

    Nintendo 2DS: Verdict

    The Nintendo 2DS feels like a budget device and it has no 3D screen capabilities. If you can get over those two caveats then this console offers the best value for money on the market at the moment.

    The catalogue of games available to play on it is arguably one of the best in existence and, at a time when every other console manufacturer is hyping up the notion of upgrading for the future, it’s rather refreshing that Nintendo is reminding gamers that ‘bigger’ isn’t necessarily ‘better’.

    Nintendo 2DS release date: 12 October 2013

    Nintendo 2DS price: £109.99

  • The Nintendo 2DS is a great entry-level handheld that offers a gateway into Nintendo’s superb DS and 3DS games catalogues. T3 went in for a closer look

    Nintendo 2DS review

    Love

    • Cheap price
    • Amazing games
    • Durable design

    Hate

    • Needs a case
    • Least elegant DS platform
    • No 3D

    It’s fair to say that the Nintendo 2DS console took a lot of people by surprise when it was announced this week. The Nintendo 3DS and Nintendo 3DS XL have been enjoying something of a renaissance of late; while the Wii U has been floundering since launch, the 3DS has shifted 1.4 million units in the last three months no doubt buoyed by strong titlessuch as Luigi’s Mansion 2, Donkey Kong Country 3D and Animal Crossing: New Leaf.

    The last thing anyone expected was Nintendo to announce a new handheld console that may eat into the profitable sales of the 3DS and 3DSXL. Especially one that’s backwards compatible with the entire DS back catalogue and looks rather ungainly at first glance.

    Nintendo 2DS: Size and build

    While all of its predecessors boast a clam-shell aesthetic, which allows users to snap them closed, the 2DS has been designed as a twin-screen slate.

    It essentially looks like a 3DS with the hinges removed. Available at launch in blue with black trimmings (“Black + Blue") and white with red trimming (“White + Red”), the 2DS boasts dual screens, two shoulder buttons, a thumbstick, a D-pad and face buttons.

    A ‘Home’ button sits directly below the lower screen and to the left is a ‘Sleep’ slider. The ‘Power’ and ‘Start’ buttons are situated on the lower right hand side and there’s a camera fitted snugly at the top of the console. There’s no slider to turn the 2DS’s Wi-Fi off, but users can do that in the settings menu.

    On the reverse side of the console, there’s a slot for the 2DS’s stylus (which comes with the 2DS as standard) and a memory card slot. The 2DS also has two cameras on its reverse side and users can capture 3D pictures using the console’s camera function.

    Nintendo 2DS: Games

     

    You won’t be able to display your photos in 3D on the 2DS, however. But you can import them to a 3DS or 3DS XL using a memory card and view the in 3D if you wish. The reason for this is that the 2DS doesn’t have 3D presentation capabilities – hence the name. The whole purpose of the 2DS seems to be aimed at giving new Nintendo handheld adopters a way into Nintendo’s DS back catalogue at a reduced price.

    That’s the console’s biggest strength next to its relatively cheap recommended retail price, really. The 2DS is backwards compatible with every single DS title ever released. If you’ve ever wanted to delve into Nintendo’s admittedly superb handheld games catalogue but were put off by its price or the stories of the 3DS causing motion sickness, the 2DS should tick all of your boxes and then some. 

    Nintendo 2DS: Verdict

    If you already own a Nintendo handheld console then the 2DS is an amusing curio at best. It’s essentially the 3DS (or DS) experience offered by a device that looks closer in its design aesthetic to a GameBoy than any of Nintendo’s snapcase consoles.

    However, if the price of a Nintendo handheld has put you off picking up one, the 2DS could fit the bill. With the exception of the 3D display, it offers all the functionality of Nintendo’s handheld consoles and is a brilliant gateway into the superb DS back catalogue. Stay tuned for a full review.

    Nintendo 2DS release date: 12 October 2013

    Nintendo 2DS price: £109

    • Nintendo 2DS unboxing
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  • Nintendo 2DS

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