iPhone 12 INCREDIBLE camera upgrade has Samsung sweating | T3

iPhone 12 INCREDIBLE camera upgrade has Samsung sweating

Apple's iPhone 12's camera gets another upgrade with a powerful new lens module

iPhone 12
(Image credit: svetapple.sk)

Rumours about the iPhone 12 have been circulating for months, teasing us with the possibility of much-needed upgrades that will finally see Apple's flagship catch up with Android smartphones – like the jump from the iPhone 11 range's 60Hz display to the iPhone 12's reported 120Hz

There's still plenty we don't know about the device – which is hopefully going to change with the upcoming Apple Event at the end of the month – but thanks to a series of new leaks, we've got a decent idea of what we can expect; and that may very well include 7P lens modules for the latest crop of iPhones. 

A new report from DigiTimes indicates that the new tech will give image and video quality a significant boost – so much so, that Android manufacturers will fall in step behind Apple. 

As competition heats up, suppliers will be vying with one another for business, which could lower costs across the board, and see the souped-up lenses become swiftly, and widely adopted.    

As it stands, Apple's iPhone 11 Pro features a 5P lens for its ultrawide camera, and a 6P lens for both its telephoto and wide angle cameras. The more premium smartphones sport five (5P) or six (6P) optical elements, which combine to correct chromatic aberration, distortion, and other optical niggles.

Switching up to a 7P lens module will provide seven elements, and while increased elements alone don't guarantee a better picture quality, when paired with the right software, it works a treat. 

The iPhone 12 is also rumored to feature 12MP camera sensors, like the iPhone 11, but with larger sensors to assist with photos taken in low light situations, as well as potential LiDAR autofocus. 

If a new 7P lens is an extra bonus that Apple is bringing to the table, we could finally be looking at upgrades in areas that Apple has been lagging behind its Android competitors on for years. 

Source: Digitimes