Best running headphones 2022 for gym, workouts, sports and running

The best running headphones and gym headphones reviewed and ranked by T3's resident workout addicts

Best running headphones: Pictured here, a handsome your man wearing the LG TONE Free fit UTF8 headphones
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(Image credit: LG)

You might be looking for the best running headphones but what follows is the list of the best headphones for workouts, gym sports … and, of course, the best headphones for running. At the end of the day, exercise is exercise, and all of the listening devices below should survive your sweatiest workouts and most intense running sessions.

The best sports headphones have every feature you might need for your workouts: they're rain- and sweatproof, have long battery life, charge quickly, and are comfortable to wear while providing a secure fit. Most sports headphones go the extra mile by providing additional features, such as active noise cancelling (ANC), personalised sound, a self-cleaning case, solar charging and more.

Whatever your activities of choice, rest assured these buds will soundtrack your path to fitness! If you're looking for sports headphones with a more specific purpose, we recommend checking out T3's best swimming headphones and best bone-conduction headphones guides. If you're seeking further sonic inspiration, we also have roundups of the best wireless headphones and best wireless earbuds.

The best running headphones to buy right now

Why you can trust T3 Our expert reviewers spend hours testing and comparing products and services so you can choose the best for you. Find out more about how we test.

Jabra Elite 7 Active

(Image credit: Matt Kollat/T3)
Best running headphones overall

Specifications

Type: Bluetooth in-ear true wireless
Battery life: 8 hours + 22 hours in the case
ANC: Yes
Weight (with medium eargel): 6.7g
Weather resistance: IP57 dust, water and sweat-proof

Reasons to buy

+
ANC tailored to your hearing
+
HearThrough transparency mode
+
MySound personalised sound
+
The liquid silicone rubber cover is soft to the touch
+
Excellent battery life + fast charging
+
Bluetooth Multipoint connectivity

Reasons to avoid

-
Not as secure as buds with wing tips/ear hooks, despite ShakeGrip technology

The Elite 7 Active buds are a significant update over the Jabra Elite Active 75t and offer more personalised sound, better fit and even improved call performance thanks to the three-microphone-per-bud setup. Active Noise Cancelling (ANC) can be personalised via the Jabra Sound+ app. ANC benefits significantly from this, and as long as you set it up correctly – i.e. in a noisy environment – it will help keep unwanted sound away from your ears so you can get in the zone faster during your workouts.

The battery life on the Jabra Elite 7 Active is also excellent. In fact, taking into account the size of the buds, eight hours of continuous playback is nothing short of awe-inspiring. The case holds another 22 hours of battery life, enabling you to keep the buds and the case charger cable-free for 30 hours. The Elite 7 Active is significantly cheaper than the Elite 7 Pro, and the only thing you miss out on is the call quality (the Elite 7 Pro has a better mic setup), which might not be as crucial from a workout point of view anyway.

Read our full Jabra Elite 7 Active review

Jaybird Vista 2 detail shotT3 Best Buy badge

(Image credit: Matt Kollat/T3)
Best waterproof running headphones

Specifications

Type: Bluetooth in-ear true wireless
Battery life: 8 hours (6 with noise cancelling on) + 16 hours in the case
ANC: Yes
Weight (with medium eargel): 6.7g
Weather resistance: IP68 and military-spec ratings for protection against dust, water, sweat, and drops

Reasons to buy

+
Great sonic performance
+
ANC plus ambient sound modes
+
More or less indestructible

Reasons to avoid

-
Fit is not as secure as earhook models

The Jaybird Vista 2 headphones are a real class act. They managed to improve on their predecessor, the excellent Jaybird Vista, by adding ambient sound mode (called SurroundSense) and improved audio performance without losing the buds' signature robust build quality. The Jaybird Vista 2 has an IP68 rating, so it should be able to withstand even the sweatiest of your workouts.

Battery life isn't bad at 6 hours – or 8 hours if you don't have noise-cancelling or SurroundSense on – and the battery case will top that up to a full 24 hours with judicious recharges. The Vista 2 also has a quick charge function; 5 minutes on the charger will replenish 1 hour of playtime. The Jaybird Vista 2 has excellent sound quality, and you can further customise the sound in the Jaybird App. Pro tip: if it feels like the Vista 2 buds aren't loud enough, it could be because the buds' volume is not connected to the Bluetooth volume. Pressing and holding the multifunctional button will increase the volume.

Read our full Jaybird Vista 2 review

Beats Fit Pro detail shotsT3 Approved badge

(Image credit: Matt Kollat/T3)
Best running headphones with wing tips

Specifications

Type: Bluetooth in-ear true wireless
Battery life: Up to 6 hours of listening time (with ANC turned on) plus an additional 18 hours in the charging case
Fast charging: Yes, 5-minute charging gives you up to 1 hour of playback
ANC: Yes
Weight (with medium eargel): 5.6 g
Weather resistance: IPX4-rated sweat and water resistant

Reasons to buy

+
Powerful ANC
+
Transparency mode
+
Secure fit via integrated wing tips
+
Spatial Audio support (only with iPhones)

Reasons to avoid

-
Mic could sound better
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Will become uncomfortable to wear after a while

The Beats Fit Pro combines great fit, easy and intuitive pairing and controls, and excellent sound quality. The battery life is about as good as you ask for out of a pair of earbuds such size, and the implementation of the active noise cancellation and transparency mode is phenomenal. Sadly, some of the features are only available to iPhone users, so if you have an Android phone, you might be better off choosing the Jabra Elite 7 Active – those buds also have ANC and transparency mode but lack the wing tips.

As expected from a pair of Beats buds, the Fit Pro has a sublime built quality and design. Unlike the Powerbeats Pro, these gym headphones have a small enough charging case you can quickly sink in your pocket. You'll not be left wanting if you grab a pair of these for your next workout.

Read our full Beats Fit Pro review

Shokz OpenRun on a brick wallT3 Award

(Image credit: Jamie Carter)
Best bone conducting headphones for running and cycling

Specifications

Type: Bone conduction
Battery life: 8 hours

Reasons to buy

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IP67-certified water-resistant
+
Excellent sound quality
+
Quick charges in 10 minutes
+
Mic for hands-free calls

Reasons to avoid

-
Small control buttons

It doesn't get much safer for runners and cyclists than wearing bone-conducting headphones, such as the Shokz OpenRun. If you haven't tried bone-conducting headphones before, these devices go around the ear and resonate the cheekbones to create sound, leaving your ears uncovered. (You'll find plenty more options in our best bone conduction headphones guide).

You will be able to listen to music without compromising your spatial awareness. As for sound quality, we were pleasantly surprised by how clear the Shokz OpenRun sounds. It'll never be as bassy or clear as when you listen to music through 'proper' running headphones, but it's clear enough to be heard in a not-too-loud environment.

On the downside, once the sound levels increase around you, it will quickly overtake the sound coming from the OpenRun, regardless of the volume. If you are a safety-conscious runner/cyclist who also happens to love listening to music as they exercise, you'll love the Shokz OpenRun.

Read our full Shokz OpenRun review

LG TONE Free fit UTF8

(Image credit: Matt Kollat/T3)

5. LG Tone Free fit UTF8

Best running headphones for small ears ans super-sweaty workouts

Specifications

Type: Bluetooth in-ear true wireless with wing tips
Battery life: 10 hours + 20 hours in the charging case (without ANC, plus quick charge)
ANC: Yes, Hybrid
Weight: 5.9 g
Weather resistance: IP67 sweat and water resistant

Reasons to buy

+
Super lightweight construction
+
IP67 water rating
+
Excellent sound performance, especially considering the small form factor
+
Strong ANC performance
+
UVnano tech in case kills 99.9% of bacteria
+
Touch controls have a good sound feedback

Reasons to avoid

-
Easy to accidentally change sound mode via touch when adjusting the buds
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Even more wing-tip options would be nice

The LG Tone Free fit UTF8 took us by surprise. Not that we didn't expect LG's dedicated workout to sound good, but these compact buds offer so much more than just excellent sound quality. Despite the small form factor – the Tone Free fit UTF8 are some of the smallest workout headphones we've tried – the earbuds sound exceptionally clear. Better still, they have ANC and Ambient Mode, so you can use them for both indoor and outdoor training.

And you will use the LG Tone Free fit UTF8 quite often since they are just so comfortable to wear. There are three wing tips and ear tips included in the box, although we have appreciated a few more as we have slightly larger ears. That aside, there is hardly anything else you could criticise about the earbuds. They are IP67-rated and can be washed under the tap after use. The case also has what's called UVnano technology that shines a blue light on the buds, which is said to kill 99.9% of the bacteria.

Another one of our favourite features is the 'Plug & Wireless' mode, which lets you use the charging case as a Bluetooth transmitter; just connect the case to the treadmill (or whatever) else via a 3.5mm jack to the USB-C cable and listen uninterrupted to the instructions coming from the running machine. Overall, the LG Tone Free fit UTF8 are excellent compact noise cancelling earbuds for running and workout

Sennheiser SPORT True Wireless review

(Image credit: Matt Kollat/T3)
Best in-ear running headphones for a secure fit

Specifications

Type: Bluetooth in-ear true wireless with wing tips
Battery life: 9 hours + 27 hours in the charging case (and quick charge)
ANC: No
Weight: 6.8 g
Weather resistance: IP54 sweat and water resistant

Reasons to buy

+
Exchangeable ear tip design allows for multiple listening modes
+
Secure fit thanks to wing tips
+
Lightweight (6.8g per bud)
+
IP54 rating
+
More 'naturtal' sound than ANC-enabled buds

Reasons to avoid

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Charing case is too bulky to sink in your pocket
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Admittedly, continuously changing ear tips is a bit of a faff
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Space for extra ear tips would be nice in the case
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Level of passive noise cancellation might be a bit much for some

What makes true wireless headphones suitable for exercise? 

A) They need to be water/sweatproof – The Sennheiser SPORT True Wireless is IP54 rated for dust and splash. Check!

B) They must have a secure but comfortable fit – These headphones fit perfectly, although they aren't most comfortable for long-term wear

C) They should have decent sound quality – The SPORT True Wireless has excellent sound, better than some more expensive headsets

D) Offers some level of situational awareness – Thanks to the 'open' and 'closed' ear adaptor system, the SPORT True Wireless not only lets in more noise when required but can also isolate you from your surroundings if that's what you want.

As you can see, the Sennheiser SPORT True Wireless is this close [holds two fingers up very close to each other] to be the perfect headphones for running and workouts. Should it not be for the faff of having to change ear tips (and the bulky charging case), it might even reach the top of our running headphones guide.

Read our full Sennheiser SPORT True Wireless review

Adidas RPT-02 SOL review

(Image credit: Matt Kollat/T3)
Best on-ear running headphones

Specifications

Type: Bluetooth on-ear true wireless headphones
Battery life: 80 hours (indefinite via light charging)
ANC: No
Weight: 256 g
Weather resistance: Sweat and water resistant

Reasons to buy

+
Washable parts increase longevity
+
Excellent sound quality
+
Great fit for workouts
+
Long battery life
+
Effective passive noise cancelling

Reasons to avoid

-
Tighter, on-ear design is great for exercise, not so much for all-day wear (especially for people with glasses)
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No ANC
-
No aPTX

The Adidas RPT-02 SOL delivers an experience you'd expect from similarly priced premium headphones: they sound good, have long battery life and have the perfect fit for workouts. The on-ear design provides excellent passive noise cancellation, maybe a bit too excellent for those who like to hear people and traffic around them. A small price to pay for better sound quality! Not to mention, you can always turn the volume down to hear your surrounding better.

The sporty fit is amazing for runs and workouts but not ideal for all-day wear, something you'll soon find out after putting the headphones on. People with glasses will feel the pressure even sooner, so if you're looking for cans to put in the office and hammer away on the keyboard all day, look elsewhere. As for light charging, you'll need a strong light source to activate the Powerfoyle cells, although it's not impossible to top the otherwise crazy-long battery life up using other light sources than the sun.

Read our full Adidas RPT-02 SOL review

Beats Powerbeats Pro running headphones detail shotT3 Awards 2022 Winner's Badge

(Image credit: Matt Kollat/T3)
Best gym headphones

Specifications

Type: Bluetooth in-ear true wireless with ear hooks
Battery life: 9 hours + 15 hours in the charging case
ANC: No
Weight: 20.3 g
Weather resistance: Sweat and water resistant

Reasons to buy

+
Incredible sound quality
+
Earhooks provide a secure fit
+
Long battery life

Reasons to avoid

-
Battery case is rather large
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Considerably heavier than non-earhook buds
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No ANC
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No ambient noise mode

The audio performance of the Beats Powerbeats Pro is beyond amazing – sound comes through the buds with the utmost clarity so that you won't miss a beat – pun intended – even if you are in the middle of the most challenging gym workout session. Thanks to the earhook design, the Powerbeats Pro headphones won't fly off your ears, no matter if you use them for running or kettlebell swings.

The only downside we can think of to Powerbeats Pro is that the battery case is considerably larger than most rivals. However, with 9 hours of life per charge and the ability to give them a charge that lasts a few hours by plugging them in for just a few minutes, the case is a less essential item than it is with other true wireless buds.

Read our full Beats Powerbeats Pro review

Soundcore Sport X10 of deskT3 Approved badge


(Image credit: Matt Kollat/T3)

9. Soundcore Sport X10

Best cheap running headphones

Specifications

Type: Bluetooth in-ear with anchoring hooks
Battery life: 9 hours, plus another 24 hours in the case (and fast charging)
ANC: Yes

Reasons to buy

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Affordable price point
+
Secure on the ears
+
Clear, bassy sound
+
ANC and Transparency modes

Reasons to avoid

-
No proximity sensor/auto-pause
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Rotating ear hooks don't radiate durability

The Soundcore Sport X10 are brilliant value-for-money wireless earbuds from Anker with SweatGuard technology – inspired by the structure of a submarine, apparently – and the signature bassy sound we know and love. Battery life is excellent, especially at this price point: eight hours in the buds plus another 24 hours in the case. 

Unlike the otherwise excellent Anker Soundcore Spirit X2 review, the Sport X10 features both active noise cancelling and transparency modes and 20 EQ modes in the Soundcore app; not to mention, there is also a custom EQ mode to further personalise the sound to your liking.

As for call quality, the Soundcore Sport X10 buds have six microphones (!) and noise cancellation technology to pick up your voice clearly and block out background noises – not too bad from cheap running headphones! Overall, very decent workout headphones for an affordable price – what more can you ask for?

Amazfit Powerbeats Pro on garden wallT3 Approved badge

(Image credit: Matt Kollat/T3)
Running headphones with built in heart rate sensor

Specifications

Type: Bone conduction
Battery life: 9 hours, plus 21 hours in the case (and fast charging)
ANC: Yes
Ambient mode: Yes

Reasons to buy

+
Built-in PPG heart rate sensor (right bud only)
+
Can even asses posture/head angle
+
Automatic run detection (logs workout into Zepp app)
+
Hearing health monitoring
+
Motion Beat mode increases bass during exercise

Reasons to avoid

-
Due to the smooth surface of the buds, it's a bit tricky to get them out of the case
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ANC could be more powerful

The Amazfit PowerBuds Pro are different from your everyday running headphones, and not just because they have an Apple AirPod-esque look. Amazfit's top-dog true wireless buds can measure heart rate and automatically detect running; better still, they can increase bass when you're running (a.k.a. Motion Beat mode) so you can hear the pounding bass in your ears better, no matter how loud the traffic is around you.

But wait, there is more! The Amazfit PowerBuds Pro have an independent acoustic module, LCP liquid crystal diaphragm, and dome pattern design which is said to provide deeper bass, calmer midrange and clearer treble for superior sound quality. Sound is, in fact, très bien, albeit lacks power in the lower registers. Never mind, if you need more bass, all you have to do is start running!

Of course, too much bass might affect the sound quality and your hearing (in a bad way), but the PowerBuds Pro are here to assist you. They have a 'Hearing health' mode which recommends a weekly time limit to wear the buds based on in-ear volume. Pretty nifty!

There is also active noise cancelling and ambient modes; the former even does its job adaptively, meaning it turns ANC up and down based on how loud the environment is around you. This works okay, although we found the ANC slightly underwhelming in loud traffic. Maybe we just like to be completely sealed off from the outside world?

We were delighted with the Amazfit Powerbuds Pro during testing. There are a lot of exciting features, and although they are not studio cans – you shouldn't expect a high-end audio experience – the sound quality is very decent. The buds are not super cheap, but you get a lot of features for your money. Highly recommended.

Read our full Amazfit PowerBuds Pro review

Shure Aonic 215 Gen 2 in its charging case

(Image credit: Matt Kollat/T3)

11. Shure Aonic 215 Gen 2

Best gym headphones for a secure fit

Specifications

Type: Bluetooth in-ear true wireless with ear hooks
Battery life: 8 hours, plus 24 hours in the case
ANC: No (it has Sound Isolating technology, though)
Ambient mode: Yes

Reasons to buy

+
Provides a secure fit
+
Excellent sound quality
+
IPX4 water rating

Reasons to avoid

-
Looks and feels like a hearing aid
-
Requires two hands to put them in your ears, especially if you wear glasses
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No ANC

Shure is renowned for its products' audio quality, and the Aonic 215 Gen 2 is no exception. It sounds terrific while providing a secure fit for workouts and running. In fact, these are the most secure earbuds we've tested since the Beats Powerbeats Pro. We might go as far as saying they sound better than those, thanks to the sound-isolating fit and the different EQ modes in the ShurePlus PLAY app.

Even if you disagree with that last statement, you must appreciate the sound quality of these buds. Shure claims the components of the Aonic 215 Gen 2 were "developed for the pros" and that you "hear the highs, the lows and everything in between" when listening to music or podcasts through the buds. We tend to agree.

Although the large over-ear hooks provide a secure fit, it's also worth mentioning that they make the buds quite bulky and almost impossible to apply using only one hand. The case is also pretty huge and requires a two-handed operation. Sadly, there is also no ANC either, although adding that would certainly temper the sound quality.

Skullcandy Push Active running headphones on a garden wallT3 Award

(Image credit: Matt Kollat)

12. Skullcandy Push Active

Beast Skullcandy running headphones

Specifications

Type: Bluetooth true wireless in-ear with anchoring hooks
Battery life: 10 hours in the buds + 34 hours in the charging case
ANC: Yes
Weight: 14g
Weather resistance: IP55 sweat and water resistant

Reasons to buy

+
Skull-iQ (hands-free voice assistant + over-the-air updates)
+
IP55 sweat and water-resistant
+
Custom EQ modes 

Reasons to avoid

-
Quite bulky design and charging case
-
No personalised sound

The Skullcandy Push Active is part of Skullcandy's latest range of wireless buds equipped with the Skull-iQ technology that allows for over-the-air updates and hands-free voice control. The latter can come in quite handy when you're on an MTB trail, wearing gloves and a bicycle helmet, making it very difficult to adjust the buds with your hands.

The sound spectrum on the Push Active is decent enough, although the buds don't sound quite as good as the Skullcandy Grind Fuel in terms of sound quality – those wireless headphones adjust the sound to your hearing. However, it must be said that the Push Active is more suited for exercise thanks to the anchoring hooks that keep the workout buds firmly in place, no matter how vigorously you're shaking your head.

Battery life is impressive: the Skullcandy Push Active running headphones last 10 hours on one charge plus there is an additional 34 hours in the case. Let's quickly check the numbers: it looks like the Push Active can work for a grand total of 44 hours on one charge. Not bad.

Bose Sport Earbuds worn by an athleteT3 Approved badge

(Image credit: Bose)
Best Bose running headphones

Specifications

Type: Bluetooth true wireless in-ear with anchoring hooks
Battery life: 5 hours (15 hours total from recharging in its case)
Noise cancelling: No

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent sound
+
More comfortable than they look
+
Good noise isolation

Reasons to avoid

-
Still quite bulky

Full marks to Bose for giving their latest buds a very self-explanatory name, and also for improving on their true wireless workout-friendly predecessor, SoundSport Free, in every way. Where those buds were quite ridiculous looking in the way that they protruded from your ears, these look relatively normal. 

Bose Sport Earbuds are still quite bulky, but they sit firmly yet comfortably in your ear. The audio is up to Bose's usual standards. While I was a bit surprised that Bose left noise cancelling out of this product – practically everything the brand puts out has ANC nowadays – it's arguably not wanted on running headphones. Thanks to the way they fit, noise isolation is excellent. The on-ear touch controls are not all that great if you're in the middle of a vigorous workout, however. 

Overall, I'd say these are a solid hybrid of everyday listening earbuds – they sound great – and running ones. A less diplomatic way of putting that is that they're a bit under-baked for workouts, and kind of ugly and short on battery life, if you want musical buds that can also stand up to sweat and activity.

That means they probably won't appeal massively to anyone other than ardent Bose-philes – but then there's certainly no shortage of them. The price is quite reasonable, though. To get the best price, be sure to check our Bose discount codes.

Read our full Bose Sport Earbuds review

How to choose the best running headphones for you

Performance headphones must sound good and stay in place during the most intense exercise sessions; otherwise, you could just get 'standard' wireless earbuds or wireless headphones. Therefore, before buying your next sports headphones, you must consider the type of exercise you prefer to do and the sound performance you're after.

Runners often choose bone-conduction headphones as they allow them to hear ambient sound, making it safer to run in areas with a lot of traffic. That said, many premium running headphones have a 'hear-through' feature, allowing the buds to let sound in.

Cyclists are in a tricky situation; they can't use bone-conduction headphones as there is too much wind noise, so they must use in-ear headphones when they ride. They are also limited in terms of design. For example, ear hook models would be ideal for cyclists to ensure they won't lose them – you really don't want headphones falling out of your ears when you're zooming down a slope at 40 mph – but since they often wear cycling sunglasses, the ears are already taken, so to say. Cyclists should use in-ear buds with excellent grip and adjustable eargels and wingtips.

Gym bunnies and buffs often use over-ear headphones to cancel out ambient noise and help them stay in the zone without having to fiddle around with how the buds fit. They don't have to worry about cars coming their way when they lift; their main concern is maintaining the mind-muscle connection.

How we test the best running headphones

Our running headphones testing process involves listening to music, podcasts and audiobooks during sweat-inducing workouts to see how well they can distract our attention from the pain caused by working out too much. As well as putting the sports headphones through their sound quality paces, we also pay particular attention to fit and how well they cope with intense head movements during HIIT workouts and sprints.

It's simply the worst when buds fall out of your ears during a run or lifting workout; as such, headphones that don't fit well can't be included in this guide. Finally, we test running earbuds' durability and sweat resistance and whether they live up to the claims manufacturers made in their promo materials. And yes, sometimes this involves taking a shower while wearing swim-proof headphones. Grow up, people.

Read about how we test at T3 by clicking on the link.

FAQ

Which type of headphones is best for sports?

Many runners prefer bone-conduction headphones for running as those leave the ears uncovered and the person more aware of their surroundings. For the same reason, these headphones might not be the most ideal in noisy environments since they let in too much ambient noise, making it hard to hear what's being played in the headphones.

Running headphones with ambient mode are a good alternative as these buds often also have active noise cancelling (ANC). When the ambient mode is turned on, the earbuds use their microphones to feedback sound from the outside world so that you're more aware. When running indoors – e.g. on a treadmill – you can activate ANC and block out sound, so you can get in the zone easier.

What are the best waterproof headphones for running?

Technically speaking, the best waterproof headphones for running is the Jaybird Vista 2, as it's IP68 rated. In fact, unless they change the ingress protection rating system, no future buds can be more resistant to solids and liquids than the Vista 2s.

That said, just because some headphones aren't IP68-rated doesn't mean they are suitable for sweaty workouts. For example, the Jabra Elite 7 Active have an IP57 rating, so unless you need headphones for swimming, they should be more than okay.

Bone conduction headphones often have an excellent ingress protection rating as they haven't got speakers – instead, they vibrate your cheekbones to produce sound. The Shokz OpenRun have an IP67 rating, so you can rinse them under the tap after workouts without any issues.

For comparison, the Beats Fit Pro are IPX4-rated, and even those headphones are said to be sweat and water-resistant. To summarise, unless you want to keep your running headphones underwater for prolonged periods of time, any headphones with at least an IPX4 rating should suffice. 

In-depth: What are the best waterproof headphones for running?

Are over-ear headphones better for running?

Many runners use over-ear headphones as they provide a more robust sound and often a more secure fit than in-ear buds. It's true – it's less likely that over-ear headphones will fall out of your ear unnoticed. However, they will make your ears warmer (not ideal for long runs) and block out ambient noise, which also isn't ideal when you run in traffic. So, as they say, you win some, you lose some when you wear over-ear headphones for running.

Is it better to run with earbuds or headphones?

Modern earbuds produce a fuller sound and provide a secure fit, making them better suited for running and workouts. Considering the small form factor, these listening devices can be worn longer than headphones, improving comfort levels. On the other hand, headphones produce a more robust sound, thanks to their larger drivers. Some people also prefer them for their noise-isolation properties; it's easier to stay in the zone when your ears are covered with huge cans. 

Do noise cancelling headphones work in the gym?

Gyms are noisy environments. Loud music blares from the speakers, weights and machines clank, and people talk and groan, which can be quite a lot to cope with both for people and headphones. Are the best gym headphones able to cope with such noise levels? Yes and no.

There are different types of noise cancellation technologies and features, including noise isolation and active noise cancellation (ANC), to name a couple. Over-ear headphones often provide at least noise isolation, as they cover your ears, naturally filtering out some of the ambient noise.

While smaller earbuds also offer some noise isolation – they sit in the ear canal, after all – they are better at providing ANC, which uses noise-cancelling speakers to reduce unwanted background noise. Premium headphones brand Bang and Olufsen uses microphones that "listen" to the sounds outside and inside of the earphones. Based on this, the ANC chipset inverts the soundwaves, and a speaker inside the earphone cancels the outside sound by neutralising the soundwaves.

This can be quite effective; some headphones can cancel out up to 42dB of noise. This is enough to make the outside world quieter, albeit not completely silent. Even if there were headphones that could completely silence all outside noise, we wouldn't recommend these in gyms, as you do have to pay attention to your surroundings in case of an emergency. Some noise isolation r cancellation is fine, though. 

Matt Kollat
Fitness Editor

Matt is T3's Fitness Editor and covers everything from smart fitness tech to running and workout shoes, home gym equipment, exercise how-tos, nutrition, cycling, and more. His byline appears in several publications, including Techradar (opens in new tab) and Fit&Well (opens in new tab), and he collaborated with other fitness content creators such as Garage Gym Reviews (opens in new tab).

With contributions from