Excitrus PDW100208 magnetic wireless power bank review

This heavyweight USB-C power bank with a MagSafe wireless charging pad is ideal for home, office and travel with electronics

Excitrus PDW100208 magnetic wireless power bank review
(Image credit: Excitrus)
T3 Verdict

Excitrus PDW100208 proves a reliable and versatile power bank on the go, but its large size does make it best for both battery-hungry trips with a laptop or for three-night off-grid trips.

Reasons to buy
  • +

    Large 20,800 mAh capacity

  • +

    MagSafe wireless charging pad

  • +

    100W PD port for charging laptops via USB-C

  • +

    Can charge 4x devices simultaneously

Reasons to avoid
  • -

    Weighs over half a kilo

  • -

    Wireless charging is a bit slow

  • -

    Gets warm during wireless charging

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    No USB-C-USB-C wall charger included

Some power banks are built for travel, others for commuting. Some have smartphone users and commuters in their sights while others are aimed more at business travellers and laptop-users. Very few are aimed at using at home, but that’s exactly what the Excitrus is perfect for – and much more besides. 

Its main trick is that it comes with a wireless charging pad on top. What's more, it's compatible with MagSafe, Apple's proprietary magnetically-attached wireless power transfer and accessory-attachment standard. MagSafe is found on Apple’s iPhones and AirPods. So does that make this power bank the best option for Apple customers and earn a place in our best power bank guide? Yes, but there’s a lot more to this high capacity all-rounder than its magnetic appeal. 

Excitrus PDW100208 magnetic wireless power bank review

(Image credit: Future)

Excitrus PDW100208 magnetic wireless power bank: design

A lithium-ion power bank capable of holding a charge of 20,800 mAh, the Excitrus comes in only one design. Its rounded corners are covered in a dark green fabric that’s both soft to the touch and will repel water (though the Excitrus doesn’t claim waterproof-ness). X marks the spot on its top, which is where you’ll find the MagSafe magneti that locks into place an iPhone (12 or 13) or an AirPods charging case. 

Measuring 113 x 222 x 48mm (so over a third longer than an iPhone) and weighing 522g, the Excitrus is larger and heavier than most of the power banks of a similar capacity. If you plan to stash it in a backpack or briefcase you shouldn’t have any issues, but it’s certainly too large – and too long – to be considered fit for a jacket pocket or a handbag. 

Inside the Excitrus there’s eight individual batteries, so there’s little chance of a catastrophic failure. 

Excitrus PDW100208 magnetic wireless power bank review

(Image credit: Future)

Excitrus PDW100208 magnetic wireless power bank: features

The MagSafe charging pad on the top of the Excitrus can send 10W into a smartphone, but it does so a bit slower than we expected; it took a 60%-charged iPhone 12 Pro to 75% in 30 minutes – so about 1% every two minutes – but it slowed-up significantly after that. So it’s best used overnight or during a long stint of work. After each wireless charging session we tried the Excitrus did feel rather hot. 

The business end of this power bank is actually where you’ll find its super-charge skills. That’s where you’ll find one USB-A port and two USB-C ports. The USB-A port can be used with a standard USB-USB-C or Apple Lightning cable to send 18W of power into a smartphone and tablet, with a special low-power mode for drip-feeding power into the likes of Apple Watch and wireless earbuds. Meanwhile, the central USB-C port can be used with USB-C cables only to send 45W for recharging MacBooks, laptops and Samsung phones. 

Next to it is another USB-C slot for the same purpose, though this one is rated at 100W so can also be used to refuel the Excitrus itself – and in super-quick time, too. The manufacturer rates it as capable of putting a 70% charge into this power bank, from empty, in an hour. Just around the corner from these three slots is a very subtle % figure that shows you precisely how much of its 20,800 mAh maximum charge is left. 

Excitrus PDW100208 magnetic wireless power bank review

(Image credit: Future)

Excitrus PDW100208 magnetic wireless power bank: performance

The Excitrus is great as an all-in-one for both off-grid travel and more travelling with a laptop, with its ability to recharge four devices making it a useful overnight workhorse in a hotel room. However, it also works really well as a wireless charging device on a desktop or on a bedside table. 

It doesn’t lack capacity; its 20,800 mAh battery and 100W-rated USB-C PD slot proved incredibly useful on a long train journey, though its ability to add about 15% of a 13-inch Macbook Pro’s 5,086 mAh battery per hour isn’t exactly super-fast. 

Topping-up an iPhone 13 Pro perched on its MagSage wireless charging pad worked well, but you do need to remember to press the button on the side of the power bank to begin charging an in-situ device. 

Best of all, all three of the slots and the wireless charging pad on the Excitrus can be used simultaneously, which is really useful for hotel rooms and during events when a bunch of devices need a top-up. 

We also love the fact that a USB-C to USB-C cable is provided in the box, because that’s crucial for using the Excitrus with a laptop, though we do wish there was a compatible wall charger in the box so we could have recharged this power bank itself super-quick. 

Excitrus PDW100208 magnetic wireless power bank review

(Image credit: Excitrus)

Excitrus PDW100208 magnetic wireless power bank: verdict

Able to refuel small devices on its wireless charging pad and a laptop via USB-C, the Excitrus PDW100208 proves a reliable and versatile power bank on the go, but its large size does make it best for both battery-hungry trips with a laptop or for three-night off-grid trips. However, it’s also a rather nice addition to a desktop or bedside table for recharging a phone while you work or sleep … and it lasts for days on end. 

Jamie is a freelance journalist, copywriter and author with 20 years' experience. He's written journalism for over 50 publications and websites and, when he's not writing, spending most of his time travelling – putting the latest travel tech through its paces.