Trust Redex mouse review: plenty of appeal for gamers

The Trust Redex mouse offers a lot of options and customisation for not much money

Trust Redex
(Image credit: Future)
T3 Verdict

The Trust Redex mouse isn't the most feature-packed gaming mouse we've ever seen, but it comes in at a very tempting price and offers plenty of value for money – you get DPI and polling rate adjustments, lighting customisations, wired or wireless operation, and more.

Reasons to buy
  • +

    Very affordable price

  • +

    Lightweight, stylish design

  • +

    Lots of custom options

Reasons to avoid
  • -

    Lighting isn't for everyone

  • -

    More premium devices available

  • -

    You might need a USB-C adapter

So you're in the market for the best mouse or the best gaming mouse at the moment, and you think the Trust Redex might be it? Well, our comprehensive review, covering everything from battery life to sensitivity settings, should help you make your decision.

We've been thoroughly testing this mouse for a few weeks now, which means we can give you a definitive verdict on it. Trust markets it as a mouse for gamers – and it will definitely appeal to that audience – but it's perfectly fine for all other computing tasks as well.

If you need more help and advice when it comes to finishing off your gaming setup, then check out our guides to the best gaming keyboards and the best gaming monitors as well. Without any further ado though, let's get on with reviewing the Trust Redex mouse.

Trust Redex mouse review: design and setup

Trust Redex

(Image credit: Future)

We've got absolutely no complaints when it comes to the fit and finish of the Trust Redex mouse: it has a comfortable, matte plastic finish on the top and the sides, and everything from the scroll wheel to the on/off switch feels like it's been well put together. Its symmetrical design makes it suitable for both left and right handers, and it measures 112 mm 54 mm x 39 mm (4.4 inches x 2.1 inches x 1.5 inches), weighing in at a relatively lightweight 86 grams or 0.19 pounds.

In the box you get the mouse itself, plus a nicely brained USB-C to USB-A cable – it's a generous length at 1.6 metres (a little over 5 feet), and you can use this to charge the mouse and to use it in wired mode. Inside the mouse casing is a USB-A dongle that lets you go wireless, though as with the cable you might need a USB-A adapter if your laptop or desktop computer doesn't have any of the bigger USB ports.

Setup is very straightforward and your mouse will start working as soon as you plug it in. You can then adjust the lighting and the custom buttons through software downloaded from the Trust website – the software works on Windows 8 and later, but there's no macOS version. You can still plug the mouse into a Mac and use it, though you don't get access to any of the extra customisations.

The Trust Redex mouse is a decent fit for our relatively large hands, though your mileage may of course vary. All of the buttons are cleverly positioned and we had no problems using the supplied software to customise the mouse the way we wanted it – as well as the standard left and right buttons, there are forward and backward buttons on the left, a middle button (the scroll wheel) and a DPI cycle button for adjusting the dots per linear inch setting (the sensitivity, essentially).

Trust Redex mouse review: features and performance

Trust Redex

(Image credit: Trust)

This is a gaming mouse that's overflowing with features: there's the adjustable DPI, for example, that we've already mentioned. Using a button on the top of the device you can cycle between DPI settings of 800 and 10,000, and there's a slider underneath for the polling rate (how often the mouse sensor checks for movement) – that can be set to 125, 500 or 1,000 Hz.

It's a level of customisation which gamers are going to love, and it means you can tailor the mouse movement to specific games and scenarios (you can also save specific profiles via the Trust Redex software). If you're in wireless mode, Trust says you can expect around 50 hours of continuous gaming use before the battery dies, and while we weren't able to test the mouse for that long in one continuous stretch, we've certainly got no reason to doubt the figure.

If you want to extend battery life, there's a physical switch on the mouse for turning off the RGB lighting effects. If you leave them on, you've got a wealth of customisation options available in the accompanying software program for Windows: from static colours to rainbow ripples, there's lots to explore. The software also lets you set up macro shortcuts to get tasks done more quickly.

All in all, it's a pleasure to use: the Kailh mechanical switches that Trust has installed under the left and right buttons here feel top quality for all of your clicking purposes, and the mouse feels remarkably lightweight as well. When you're done with your gaming, the mouse is more than capable of taking care of all your other computing needs too.

Trust Redex mouse review: price and verdict

Trust Redex

(Image credit: Trust)

The widgets embedded on this page should show you the latest online prices for the Trust Redex gaming mouse, but at the time of writing we were seeing it available for somewhere in the region of £35 – and considering everything you're getting back in return, that's a rather appealing price point in our eyes.

There are gaming mice out there that offer more features and more control, and which have a more heavy duty, premium feel – mice that you can adjust the weight of, for example – but if you're looking for value for money and just the key customisations that gamers need, then the Trust Redex might be for you.

And of course you need to consider the rest of your gaming setup: if you're already using a Trust keyboard and a Trust headset for example, then this is going to fit in very neatly indeed. You can of course adjust the lighting on the mouse so it matches the aesthetic that you're going for, or just turn it off.

Another mention too for the software that you can download from the Trust website to configure the mouse. It's not the most feature-packed utility we've ever seen, but it covers all the key areas you want to see (lighting, macros, custom shortcuts) and there's no doubt that it's intuitive and straightforward to use.

Dave has over 20 years' experience in the tech journalism industry, covering hardware and software across mobile, computing, smart home, home entertainment, wearables, gaming and the web – you can find his writing online, in print, and even in the occasional scientific paper, across major tech titles like T3, TechRadar, Gizmodo and Wired. Outside of work, he enjoys long walks in the countryside, skiing down mountains, watching football matches (as long as his team is winning) and keeping up with the latest movies.