The AMD Radeon RX6600 XT could be a crypto hero

The efficiency of the AMD RX 6600 XT could be perfect for crypto mining but it will be gamers that pay

AMD RX 6600 XT
(Image credit: AMD)

The AMD RX 6600 XT is the company’s latest graphics card and is design to cope with the 1080p next-generation games as a competitor for the Nvidia GeForce RTX 3060. However, a recent chart posted on Reddit suggests that it may have other uses.

Like many high-performance graphics cards, it seems the RX 660 XT is ideal for crypto mining. Not such much because of its power but more because of its power efficiency.

To optimize the mining process of cryptocurrency, such as Ethereum, you need the best possible performance for the least amount of power, especially if you need to factor the cost of electricity into your profits.

AMD RX 6600 XT

Courtesy of Trollatopoulous, AMD Reddit

(Image credit: Reddit)

According to Trollatopoulous on the AMD Reddit, the RX 6600 XT produces a relatively low hash rate of 32 MH/s but does it at just 55 Watts. This gives it the highest performance per Watt (PPW) of any of the major mining graphics cards. And that efficiency means greater profits.

Our sister site, TechRadar reviewed the AMD RX 6600 XT and confirmed that while it doesn’t perform as well as the Nvidia RTX 3060 Ti for gaming, it does run on smaller power supplies.

The Reddit figures are yet to be verified but if they are correct, it’s great news for crypto miners but bad news for gamers. At a time when getting hold of any high-performance graphics card is next to impossible, the new lower-powered RX 6600 XT offered some hope.

Now, however, with the mining community likely to be getting in line for one, it’s likely to be even harder to find one of these for sale at any price, let alone the recommended retail price of $379 (about £270, AU$520).

Mat Gallagher
Mat Gallagher

As T3's Managing Editor in the US, Mat is a true lover of gadgets, but especially anything that involves cameras, cars, music or travel. Originally from the UK, he has written about technology since 2003 and is now based in Chicago.