Peaky Blinders spirits combine your love of high-class booze with your love of extreme violence in 1920s Birmingham

Posh gin, spiced rum and Irish whiskey make up the rogue's gallery of high-class liquors

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With Christmas just around the corner, what better time to sup fine spirits themed around a cult BBC2/Netflix gangster drama, set in 1920s Birmingham?

If you're familiar with Peaky Blinders, you'll know that it's a series in which handsome men in flat caps commit acts of extreme violence, in the inter-war years. To celebrate this, widely-respected booze brand Sadler's has created the following spirits…

Peaky Blinder Irish Whiskey

This is "a nod to the Irish community prevalent in the Peaky Blinders period." Many of whom, on the TV show, in a no-way-stereotypical fashion, were violent criminals. But never mind that. This bold yet smooth, triple-distilled, blended whiskey is "finished in a sherry cask." It also boasts, "an aroma of cracked nuts," which sounds painful, yet tastes delightful.

Peaky Blinder Spiced Dry Gin

With gin production synonymous with London and Scotland, the presence of gin in the Peaky Blinder booze line-up could suggest a rival 'firm' coming down to Birmingham to subject our titular heroes to bloody violence. But no, here it is a "nod to the 1920s gin cocktail culture, a small batch, handcrafted spiced dry gin, made from a carefully selected collection of nine exotic botanicals." Be warned: "peppery notes of ginger" and the "grains of paradise" mean that, rather like a fight involving razor blades, this gin is "not for the faint-hearted".

Peaky Blinder Black Spiced Rum

"Small batch, bold and black," this exotic booze was as popular in the 1920s as betrayal by Russians over a bank heist. It's here brought up to date with "essences of orange, nutmeg, vanilla and raisin… and aged in ex-Pedro Ximenez sherry casks for a distinctive finish." A finish almost as distinctive as being mown down in a hail of bullets, from a cart. 

Apologies if you've not seen Peaky Blinders and none of the above references make any sense to you.