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It's a day ending in "y", and that means there's a new Google feature to play with. Today's one is a handy new feature for Chrome users: if you're using the browser on a PC, Mac or Chromebook there's a useful new shortcut that enables you to search key information – your bookmarks, your browsing history or your eleventy billion open tabs – from the Address Bar. The feature is in Chrome 106, which is now available.

The feature isn't on by default, but enabling it takes seconds. All you need to do is enter this flag in the address bar:

chrome://flags/#omnibox-site-search-starter-pack

And that's it.

How to use the new search feature in Google Chrome

As 9to5google reports (opens in new tab), once you've enabled the feature it couldn't be easier to use. Simply type @history, @tabs or @bookmarks and press space, and the Address Bar will automatically change to Search History, Search Tabs or Search Bookmarks.

The new feature is part of Chrome Actions, which enable you to type commands such as "clear browsing data" into the address bar and have the browser take you to the correct page. Chrome Actions are a big part of the forthcoming address bar (Google calls it the Omnibox) redesign, and will make it easier to access key settings and information by typing commands into the search field.

I'm a big fan of keyboard shortcuts like this: when you're using your device for work it's often much faster to type a command or press a keyboard combination than to wade through menu options. The new feature might not seem like a big deal, but it could be a pretty big time saver.

Writer, musician and broadcaster Carrie Marshall has been covering technology since 1998 and is particularly interested in how tech can help us live our best lives. Her CV is a who’s who of magazines, newspapers, websites and radio programmes ranging from T3, Techradar and MacFormat to the BBC, Sunday Post and People’s Friend. Carrie has written thirteen books, ghost-wrote two more and co-wrote another seven books and a Radio 2 documentary series. When she’s not scribbling, she’s the singer in Glaswegian rock band HAVR (havrmusic.com (opens in new tab)).