Galaxy S21 Ultra surprise sees this S20 Ultra feature scrapped

Samsung Galaxy S21 Ultra struggles to live up to the Galaxy S20 Ultra

Samsung Galaxy S21
(Image credit: OnLeaks)

Leaks and rumors about Samsung's Galaxy S21 are coming thick and fast as we barrel towards 2021, with a launch speculated for as early as January

The general consensus is that the series is getting a downgrade of sorts, along with the Note line (possibly even a merging of the two devices), as Samsung pivots its attention to its new flagship – the follow-up to the Galaxy Z Fold 2.

We've already seen what the handset might look like thanks to some leaked CAD drawings, but now another tidbit has surfaced suggesting that the Galaxy S21 Ultra – the top tier smartphone in the series – could be lagging behind its predecessor, the Galaxy S20 Ultra.

Twitter Tipster Ishan Agarwal has detailed a handful of the Galaxy S21 Ultra's specs to 91mobiles , and it seems that the S20 Ultra's 6.9-inch AMOLED display is getting bumped down a notch to 6.8-inches. Whether this is an ergonomic choice, or is being done to simply cut costs, is anyone's guess at this point, but the evidence so far suggests it could be one of many reported downgrades.  

The battery is still 5,000mAh across the premium models, and the camera specs appear to be largely unchanged, with Agarwal stating the S21 Ultra will sport a 108MP main shooter, and 40MP front-facing camera.

That was all of the information he shared, but we do know that the camera housing is getting an overhaul, and we may even see a drastic new design that takes a leaf out of the iPhone 12's book.

If Samsung is looking to make its foldables its new focal point, we can expect to see some cost-saving features making their way into the S and Note series as it transitions to the new tech. 

As some tipsters are suggesting, if you were waiting to pick up an S series Samsung phone, the S20 range is probably your best bet. Be sure to bookmark our Black Friday deals page for upcoming smartphone bargains.  

Source: 91mobiles