NQi GTS review: a futuristic electric scooter that offers proper punch

With a top speed of 50 mph, good range and plenty of features, the NQi GTS is a top e-moped choice

T3 Platinum Award
NQi GTS electric scooter in white being ridden by a man in sunglasses on a freeway
(Image credit: Future)
T3 Verdict

If you're looking for an electric scooter then the NQi GTS is a great choice. It's got a proper punch in the power department thanks to a 50mph top speed, while its ease of use will appeal to new and casual riders, with modern braking and security systems coming as standard.

Reasons to buy
  • +

    CBT friendly

  • +

    Genuinely can hit 50mph

  • +

    Big clear TFT display

  • +

    Three different riding modes

  • +

    Built-in alarm

  • +

    CBS braking system

  • +

    Easy to charge

Reasons to avoid
  • -

    The futuristic aesthetic will be divisive

  • -

    Twist and go riding character

  • -

    Pillion passenger space was limited when rider wears a backpack

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Welcome to T3's NQi GTS review. I've been riding this electric scooter for a few weeks now and right here, as T3's resident motorcyclist, I give you my considered take on just what it is like to use.

For the record, so you know my credentials as a reviewer, I own a full Category A motorcycle licence and own and ride an Aprilia RSV 1000R sports bike. While working on T3 I have reviewed a number of motorbikes, with a specialty in electric bikes such as the Harley-Davidson LiveWire.

Ok, with that done, let's get stuck into the NQi GTS review.

NQi GTS review

The NQi GTS' badge up close.

(Image credit: Future)

NQi GTS review: price and colors

The NQi GTS price is €3,999, with that figure climbing to €4,999  if you opt for the extended range dual 60v35aH battery pack version. The NQi GTS can be bought through the official NIU website (opens in new tab).

In terms of colorways, there are three to choose from, including matte grey, glossy black, and white with a go-faster red racing stripe. The model tested was the matte grey NQi GTS.

In my opinion, though, the model I'd plump for is the white with red go-faster racing stripe. It retains the bike's futuristic look but imbues it with a more classic, eye-catching paint job.

NQi GTS review

The NQi GTS side-on, showing its clean, futuristic fairings.

(Image credit: Future)

NQi GTS review: design and power

What a difference a month or so makes, as it was only recently that I rode a very retro-themed electric bike in the form of the Maeving RM1 – a bike that was made to look like it came from the past. The NQi GTS on the other hand, though, looks like an electric scooter from the future.

The look, especially in the matte grey colorway that my test bike was delivered in, is all smooth clean surfaces with minimal detailing. It's as if the designers purposely stripped detail out of the scooter's fairings, and the result is a scooter that looks like it fell out of the movie Tron.

NQi GTS review

The large and clear TFT screen of the NQi GTS.

(Image credit: Future)

The same is true for the instrument cluster, with the typical bike handlebars and controls partnered with a very modern color TFT display. This is large and quite bright. The same can be said for the single large, center-mounted headlight on the front of the NQi GTS.

Oh, and the moped's licence plate holder is also mounted in the position-du-jour, on the rear wheel's mudguard. I'm still not a fan of this placement, but it is where a lot of modern bikes are mounting plates now.

NQi GTS review

The rear battery of the NQi GTS shown with the bike's seat removed.

(Image credit: Future)

Things are a bit more traditional design-wise with both a kick-stand and center-stand, meaning you can jack the scooter up in multiple ways as desired. The more traditional aspects of the scooter's design can also be seen in the telescopic rear-view mirrors and pillion seat grab handles.

NQi GTS review

The illuminated ignition barrel of the NQi GTS.

(Image credit: Future)

The bike's power sources, its batteries (dual lithium-ion battery system), are mounted both under the footplate (which is covered with a removable rubber mat) and the seat. Both can be easily accessed to get to the batteries for charging.

Other small design details that I liked were that the bike's ignition barrel (even though the bike doesn't need a key inserted to actually ride) is illuminated, and there's a USB charging port easily accessible beneath the instrument cluster for charging/powering devices while on the go.

NQi GTS review

The NQi GTS's battery charger on the floor of my garage.

(Image credit: Future)

In terms of charging, the NQi GTS comes with a robust charger (viewable in the picture above) which connects to a standard wall socket plug. You can charge both batteries at once using this, so it is a simple case of plugging it in and then plugging the bike's batteries in.

NQi GTS review

Ready. Set. Go! Note, you do not need the key in the ignition barrel to ride.

(Image credit: Future)

NQi GTS review: ride and performance

The NQi GTS is a twist-and-go electric scooter that is CBT friendly, and as with a lot of scooters, that is absolutely the CBT market I feel this bike is aimed at. Turn it on remotely with the key fob, climb on board and select a riding mode, and then twist the throttle and off you go.

There's no noise other than the characteristic whine of the electric motor when you do start moving, which as I've said before as a rider of traditional combustion engine-powered bikes, is a bit odd at first, but you soon get used to the quiet. And I can imagine for a lot of the target demographic for this scooter the less noise it makes the more appealing it will be.

NQi GTS review

The NQi GTS has a traditional bike control layout.

(Image credit: Future)

There are three riding modes on offer to choose from on the NQi GTS, including Sport, E-Save and Dynamic. These modes basically translate to maximum power, maximum range, and a bit of both, so you can very much choose what will suit you most.

I live about 4 miles out of Bath in a village, which requires me to commute down a 50mph A-road, so I rode the NQi GTS mostly in Sport mode. This unlocked the bike's maximum speed of 50mph – and I can pleasingly report this bike does actually make that.

Indeed, I would say one of the NQi GTS' best qualities is that in sports mode it is properly punchy for an electric scooter, accelerating quickly and continuing to climb up to 50mph, which means that all but the fastest main roads can be tackled.

NQi GTS review

The NQi GTS 90/90-14 front tire.

(Image credit: Future)

Drop the bike into the eco E-Save mode, though, and that top speed drops dramatically. But in return you get much-extended range, so it really depends on what you need from the bike. If you're just pootling around inner city London, say, then E-Save and Dynamic will likely be enough for your needs, and they will elongate the amount of time you can ride without having to recharge the bike.

As I always do on my electric bike tests, I took the NQi GTS up the steep hills around where I live, and, while I did see maximum speed drop to about 30mph (even in Sport mode) while going up them, this bike did perform better than others I've tested recently. This again is a testament to this bike's powerful electric motor and added punch.

Do you still feel a bit guilty about traffic building up behind you on these hills? Yes, totally, but I didn't feel as bad on the NQi GTS as I have on other vehicles.

NQi GTS review

The large blocky rear brake light

(Image credit: Future)

One thing I didn't think was ideal was the pillion passenger carrying ability. Can this bike carry a pillion? Absolutely. But when I took my daughter to school on it, where both she and I both needed to be wearing our backpacks, then it was a tight fit. What I will say is that if the rider isn't wearing a backpack then you'll be fine, but if they do then space for the pillion is really not great.

Of course, in order to carry a pillion you need to progress higher than a CBT licence anyway, so I guess a lot of GTS riders won't be doing that.

NQi GTS review

The stitching work on the NQi GTS' seat is neat.

(Image credit: Future)

In terms of riding, I also rode around Bath and its environs, as well as took a short jaunt towards Bristol on the NQi GTS. And I can say that I found it very easy and trouble-free to use. There's no drama and the thing feels well planted, with plenty of space for the rider to tuck their legs in.

As ever with twist-and-go electric bikes, I found the riding experience a bit flat and lacking a real noticeable character, but in terms of getting from A to B over a short distance quickly and without fuss, the NQi GTS performed admirably.

NQi sells this bike under the idea that the GTS can "take you farther, faster", and I can confirm that it will do this better than a lot of rival electric mopeds on the market today. I think for what the GTS is designed for, its performance is impressive.

NQi GTS review

The NQi GTS in this colorway is like a stealth urban commuter from the year 2035.

(Image credit: NQi)

Last thing to mention on performance is braking. The NQi GTS comes fitted with a CBS braking system that splits braking force between the front and rear brake discs to help reduce stopping distance.

I can confirm that, thankfully, I didn't have to pull off any emergency brakes while riding the NQi GTS, but the brakes felt sharp and perfectly capable of stopping the scooter in a safe and timely manner each time. There was a decent amount of feel to the road surface, too, which was nice to see.

NQi GTS electric scooter in white charging via cable

(Image credit: NQi)

NQi GTS review: verdict

Overall, then, I've come away with a very positive opinion of the NQi GTS in every aspect maybe apart from its looks, which I am still not sold on, as well as potentially limited ability to carry pillion passengers if the main rider is wearing a backpack.

Some sort of panniers on the NQi GTS would likely solve this latter point, though, and as I've said earlier, CBT licence holders won't be carrying pillions anyway.

I think I'd warm to the bike aesthetically more if I'd tested the white with red go faster stripe colorway, rather than the matte grey stealth commuter I rode, but you may feel differently.

NQi GTS

(Image credit: NQi)

In terms of performance and features, though, the NQi GTS is a 5-star electric moped.

The NQi GTS comes with three riding modes, can hit 50mph, and push on for well over 40 miles on a single charge in its eco setting. It's got good acceleration, too, not feeling sluggish and, naturally for a scooter, feels nimble, light and easy to maneuver in dense traffic.

Yes, sure, you aren't going to want to ride on this on fast open roads for a very long time, but with that 50mph top speed you could do it. Charging is also very simple – plug the bike's batteries in and leave to charge overnight.

Finally, the NQi GTS's suite of modern features such as a large color TFT display, CBS braking system, and a built-in alarm adds to the sense that you're getting the full package here. And, with the bike starting at €3,999, I think that's a really attractive proposition.

Good job NQi!

Deputy Editor for T3.com, Rob has been writing about computing, gaming, mobile, home entertainment technology, toys (specifically Lego and board games), smart home and more for over 15 years. You can find Rob's work in magazines, bookazines and online, as well as on podcasts and videos, too. Outside of his work Rob is passionate about motorbikes, skiing/snowboarding and team sports, with football and cricket two favourites. Feel free to contact him with any related products, events, and announcements.