Moto Watch 100 is the budget smartwatch that could worry Samsung

The successor to the Moto 360 brings its own OS, a 14-day battery and a very appealing price

Moto Watch 100
(Image credit: Motorola)

Leaked just a few hours ahead of its release, the Moto Watch dropped into our lives faster than a PS5 restock. The long-awaited follow-up to the popular Moto 360 has a definite sports focus and some impressive specs, that could rival some of the best smartwatches, especially considering the price. 

The Moto Watch 100 is breaking conventions. For a start, it has rejected the Wear OS platform in favor of its own Moto OS. While this seems like a strange move, it has allowed the device to offer a huge two-week battery life and a very health-focused approach. It’s also likely to be one of the reasons that this model is being released for just $99. Forgoing licensing fees much have helped keep that cost down. 

Then there’s the strap. The quick-release strap connectors make it compatible with thousands of existing straps rather than requiring you to buy pricey own-brand ones. It’s as if this watch has been made by fans rather than a big corporation such as Motorola. 

Moto Watch 100

(Image credit: Motorola)

Well, there is a reason for that too. The Moto Watch 100, like the Moto 360 is actually made by a company called eBuyNow that has licensed the Motorola name for its wearable products. It's a relationship that has proved beneficial for both parties, especially if this new model is as good as it sounds.

The Moto Watch 100 comes in a choice of silver or black and is available to pre-order now in the US and Canada, priced $99 ($129 CAD) with shipping from December 10. Currently, the UK Motowatch website just says coming soon but I expect it will get a global release in 2022. 

Moto Watch 100

The Moto Watch 100 is light in weight, and on your wallet

(Image credit: Motorola)
Mat Gallagher
Mat Gallagher

As T3's Managing Editor in the US, Mat has his finger on the pulse for the latest advances in technology. Originally from the UK, he has written about technology since 2003 and after stints in Beijing and Hong Kong, is now based in Chicago. He’s a true lover of gadgets, but especially anything that involves cameras, electric cars, musical instruments or travel.