Lomography Fisheye Baby 110 review: Hands-on

The Lomography Fisheye Baby 110 is the brand's first camera to use 110 film

What is a hands on review?
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Lomography Fisheye Baby 110 review
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Lomography Fisheye Baby 110 review
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Lomography Fisheye Baby 110 review
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Lomography Fisheye Baby 110 review
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Lomography Fisheye Baby 110 review
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Lomography Fisheye Baby 110 review
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Lomography Fisheye Baby 110 review
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Lomography Fisheye Baby 110 review
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Lomography Fisheye Baby 110 review
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Lomography Fisheye Baby 110 review

Lomography is well known for its film-only cameras such as the LC-Wide and the LomoKino movie camera and the latest addition to its analogue arsenal is the Lomography Fisheye Baby 110. We were invited along to Lomography's London HQ for a sneak preview...

The 110 film format was originally launched by Kodak back in the 1970s, with the idea being that it was much easier to load than traditional 35mm film as you simply had to slot the cartridge into the camera, rather than fiddling around trying to attached the film to a spool.

You might have even had one of the slimline cameras youself, although after their popularity waned, 110 film went out of production in 2009, before being reintroduced by the Lomo chaps a short while ago.

Lomography Fisheye Baby 110: Build

The Lomo Fisheye Baby 110 looks just like one of the brand's standard fisheye cameras, but in minature form, measuring in at a diminutive 68.5 x 70 x 51mm without the film, As the name suggests, it sports a 13mm fisheye lens.

The snapper comes with a 'modelling back' (ie. the back panel of the camera body) which is kept in place while the camera is unloaded. This is then swapped for the supplied 'film transportation back' to which to film cartridge is easily attached.

Lomography also hinted to us that we can expect minature 110 versions of other cameras from the Lomo lineup in the future. If we had to put money on it, we'd say that the Diana F+, Sprocket Rocket, and the La Sardina would be the most likely candidates for a 110 makeover.

There are two versions of the Fisheye Baby 110 available - the basic version features a white finish and comes with a £35 price tag, while the metal version (with a finish to match), also includes an input for a PC flash cable.

Lomography Fisheye Baby 110: Controls

Apart from the shutter release, the only control that you'll find on the camera's tiny chassis is an N/B switch for adjusting the shutter speed, enabling you to take long exposures.

Lomography Fisheye Baby 110: Film

Unless you've got some old film lying about or you're willing to scour ebay for out-of-date stock, the brand's recently launched Lomography Orca 110 B&W is currently the only 110 film that you can buy.

Lomo will be launching more films in the not-too-distant future, presumably a colour version, and maybe even a slide film, if we're lucky. We're told that the next run of Orca film will also include numbered frames.

The camera enables you to switch films halfway through, although you will lose one frame in the process. You'll be able to get the film processed at the LomoLab, or you may be able to find a sympathetic photo lab near you, but the like of Boots of Snappy Snaps probably won't be able to help you with this one.

Lomography Fisheye Baby 110: Verdict

The Lomography Fisheye Baby 100 looks like a cheap, fun snapper, although the cost of getting the 110 film processed might take the fun out of it somewhat. However, it's a good option if you want an affordable analogue cam to take to a festival or on a night out. We'll bring you a full review as soon as we can get our snaps developed.

Lomography Fisheye Baby 110 availability: Available now

Lomography Fisheye Baby 110 £35 (Basic), £49 (Metal)

What is a hands on review?

'Hands on reviews' are a journalist's first impressions of a piece of kit based on spending some time with it. It may be just a few moments, or a few hours. The important thing is we have been able to play with it ourselves and can give you some sense of what it's like to use, even if it's only an embryonic view.