Nokia's big switch: Motorola's gone through it before

Motorola knows the importance of making tough OS decisions

Nokia's gone WP7 as the Symbian platform fades away. Motorola made their move 3 years ago

Four years ago Apple's announcement of the original iPhone marked a big shift in how the world viewed the smartphone. Suddenly software and user experience were equally as important as hardware. Phone companies that had previously dominated the market suddenly found themselves struggling to compete.

Motorola had enjoyed remarkable success thanks to the slim, attractive design of its Razr handset that appealed to young and old alike. However, with the arrival of iOS and Android, Moto's market share began to dwindle. Customers found their proprietary OS to be clunky and lacking compared to the more elegant and powerful offerings from Apple and Google.

.relatedLinksLeft { font-size:12px; width:300px; margin:12px 12px 12px 0; float:left; padding:0px 0px 10px 0px; background:#ececec; } h3.rlTitle {margin:0px; display:block; padding:5px 0 4px 15px !important; background:#ddd; }

Motorola had to make a change fast, and they did. The decision was made to focus its attentions on the greenhorn Android system and Andy Hooper - Motorola Mobility's director for European & MEA converged experiences - believes that the decision has brought Motorola "back in the game".

Now Nokia is going through a similar struggle and recently-appointed CEO Stephen Elop is not pulling any punches. In an internal memo he slammed the company's former pride and joy, calling the Symbian OS "a burning platform" and saying that they must "change [their] behaviour."

Andy Hooper said today that when he sees what's happening with Nokia and understands the processes Nokia will be undertaking because they "went through it three years ago."

Nokia's platform woes were resolved with the announcement that they would be focusing on Windows Phone 7 devices in the future. With the OS still relatively unproven, Nokia's gamble closely resembles Motorola's early adoption of Android. We'll have to wait and see if Nokia put its eggs in the right basket.

Did Nokia made the right choice with Windows Phone 7? Or are you mourning the loss of Symbian? Let us know via the T3 Twitter and Facebook feeds.

Via: TechRadar